Associations

Do Something Fun

As someone who doesn’t often watch T.V., I decided to use this opportunity to start a series recommended earlier by a friend: Jane the Virgin. Yeah, I know, the Title Creation Committee could have used some lessons on creativity themselves.

I treated myself to a coffee while I watched. The reason I don’t watch a lot of T.V. is because I don’t like to sit still. And that’s how Starbuck got a face lift.

Mind Map (imagine)

Mind Map (digitization)

(I was unable to save my mind map as anything other than a photo)

Suggested themes

  1. Clean Water: Something many of us take for granted, clean water is not accessible to many people all over the world and spreads many illnesses, as well as keeps people from advancing their lives as they lack a basic need. Through design, a somewhat simple product would be able to completely change those people’s lives.
  2. Blindness/ sight problems: Many people are impacted by sight issues, which can debilitate their lives. Although there are many products to help people with these problems, it would be interesting to see what a taking a fresh approach could create.
  3. Prosthetic design: This is a growing field where design is used to reshape the lives of people who have lost limbs/other body parts or were born without them and would be very interesting to learn more about.

10 Silly Ideas

For a deaf person to communicate with a hearing person; glasses hear words and translate to hand signs shown on screens.

For a hearing person to communicate with the deaf: signs are translated into audio.

Hat rids air around wearer of allergens
Massage backpack
Shoes for the blind: Ultrasonic sensors sense where objects are and vibrate in corresponding location to alert wearer.
Sensors in pillow track how many hours/how much you tossed and turned throughout the night.
Tracks heart rate while being used
People with anxiety disorders often listen to alpha and beta sound waves to calm them: this jewelry disguises the device and lets them always have it on them.
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