Last month, we decided to wait to release the XOXO talk videos until after the election — when the stress and anxiety of this political train wreck would finally be over.

Yeah. Well.

It’s hard not to feel a bit hopeless right now. Many of the things I’ve focused on in the last few years now feel trivial, or badly broken, in the wake of last week’s election.

Last February, we opened the XOXO Outpost, a shared workspace for independent artists and creators working online. Today, 85 people work in the space across all disciplines and backgrounds. It’s pretty great.


Announcing the launch lineup for XOXO’s shared workspace

Last week, we opened the doors to The Outpost — XOXO’s new shared workspace for independent artists using the Internet to make a living.

We’ve filled the Outpost with people and projects we love — game designers, cartoonists, filmmakers, musicians, creative coders, writers, podcasters, fashion designers, and more.

Today, we’re ready to announce the Outpost’s launch lineup, an incredible list of indies currently working in the space that’s growing every day.

Come and knock on our door.

Like the festival itself, it can be hard to explain why the Outpost is special for those who haven’t experienced it, but here’s a start:

  1. It’s curated. The people…


Illustration by Brendan Monroe

This year is the fourth year of XOXO, and it’s starting to look less and less like an annual event and more like a community — a group of like-minded people all dealing with similar hopes, dreams, and challenges around living and working online.

Every year, we bring over 100+ artists, hackers, and makers to Portland to talk about their work, and 1,000 attendees to share in the experience. Since 2012, it’s led to new projects, new collaborations, and new friendships.

Ultimately, XOXO is an experiment. We keep changing it based on the stories we hear from you, and try…


𝕋𝔼𝔸𝕄𝕎𝕆ℝ𝕂

𝕒 𝕡𝕝𝕒𝕪 𝕚𝕟 𝕥𝕙𝕣𝕖𝕖 𝕒𝕔𝕥𝕤

𝔼ℙ𝕀𝕃𝕆𝔾𝕌𝔼

~𝖋𝖎𝖓~


Twitter’s Promoted Tweets are, at best, a necessary evil. At worst, they’re tweets from @Satan himself — brands shoving their unwanted products into your carefully-curated timelines.

But with today’s news that we’ll soon start seeing Twitter Ads outside of Twitter, I thought I’d take a deeper look to see if I could exploit Promoted Tweets for my own personal enjoyment.

I found this on Twitter’s official brand assets site, so I’m going to assume it’s safe to use.

Targeting individuals

Twitter supports promoting tweets to “tailored audiences,” a list of email addresses, phone numbers, or Twitter usernames for the people you want to target.

My first impulse was to use this to promote a tweet to a single person. …


As Google abandons its past, Internet archivists step in to save our collective memory

Google wrote its mission statement in 1999, a year after launch, setting the course for the company’s next decade:

“Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.”

For years, Google’s mission included the preservation of the past.

In 2001, Google made their first acquisition, the Deja archives. The largest collection of Usenet archives, Google relaunched it as Google Groups, supplemented with archived messages going back to 1981.

In 2004, Google Books signaled the company’s intention to scan every known book, partnering with libraries and developing its own book scanner capable of digitizing 1,000…


Pirates are now watching films at higher quality than the industry insiders voting on them.

Tracking 13 Years of Data

In January 2004, the Los Angeles Times published an article headlined “Screener Ends Up on the Internet,” a story about the recent leak of the Something’s Gotta Give screener copy intended for Oscar voters.

This headline struck me as laughably clueless — like reading “Local Man Views Pornography On Internet” — but the MPAA statements inside were even more surreal, claiming it “marked the first time a so-called screener sent to an Oscar voter had been made available for illegal copying.”

Anyone who’d spent ten…


Twitter, plagiarism, and multiple discovery

Last Thursday, The New Yorker published Ayn Rand Reviews Children’s Movies, a very funny series of capsule film reviews written from the perspective of the notoriously humorless, cat-loving Objectivist.

For example…

“Old Yeller”
A farm animal ceases to be useful and is disposed of humanely. A valuable lesson for children. — Four stars.

“The Muppets Take Manhattan”
This movie was a disappointment. The Muppets do not take Manhattan at all. They merely visit it. — No stars.

“Babe”
Another pig farmer fails to do his job. — No stars.

Brilliantly penned by The Toast’s Mallory Ortberg, the…


An experiment in forced nostalgia and questionable parenting

There’s a classic Steve Martin bit from A Wild and Crazy Guy…

“I got a great dirty trick you can play on a three-year-old kid… Whenever you’re around him, talk wrong. So now it’s like his first day in school and he raises his hand, ‘May I mambo dogface to the banana patch?’”

I’m not sure if it’s a great idea to take parenting advice from 1970s standup albums, but this always made sense to me.

If you have a kid, why not run experiments on them? It’s like running experiments on a little clone of yourself! …


Digging through 316,669 tweets from three days of Twitter’s two-month-old trainwreck

Two months ago today, actor Adam Baldwin was the first to use the #Gamergate hashtag on Twitter, solidifying a name for the movement that’s dominated all conversations in gaming since. Depending on where you sit on the issue, it’s either a widespread campaign of harassment against women or, actually, about ethics in videogames journalism.

Anyone who’s mentioned the #Gamergate hashtag in a critical light knows the feeling: a swarm of seemingly random, largely-anonymous people descending to comment and criticize.

I’ve been using Twitter for eight years, but I’ve never seen behavior quite…

Andy Baio

I make web stuff. @waxy, @xoxo, @upcomingorg, @playfic, @supercutorg, Kind of Bloop. Helped build @kickstarter. P.S. I love you.

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