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Recently, a great developer enrolled in my weekly iOS Computer Science Lab approached me with a link on how to write a popular algorithm in Swift. Since we review similar concepts in class, I was intrigued and proceeded to check out the details. Even though the essay had received many views (likes), disappointment set in as I realized portions were lacking, were poorly communicated and technically incomplete. To support my assumptions, the author was unable to answer questions asked by audience members.

It’s common for a developer to be asked by a project manager or stakeholder to “codify” some new process or business rule. Many solutions can be fulfilled through predefined SDK Framework functions or third-party libraries. Other times we have to roll up our sleeves and think about how a system or process could work. In essence, this is the value we bring to a business or project. As a result, here are five tips to consider when writing your own algorithms. These suggestions can be applied during a technical interview or when planning your next project. …


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After helping iOS developers prepare for technical interviews, I like to reconnect with folks to discuss tough questions that they were asked. Recently, I came across an interesting challenge that involved binary notation and thought it worthy of a review. Even though it’s rare for hiring managers to ask candidates questions on this topic, this one has less to do with the notation and more to do with data management. For example:

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For this challenge, our goal is to convert the binary value of “1001” to its regular base-10 equivalent. For our implementation, we’ll somehow manipulate our structure to return an Int `value of 9. …


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When helping iOS developers prepare for technical interviews I like to put a focus on popular “gotchas” most likely to be asked by hiring managers. Beyond essential data structures and algorithms, a good way to test one’s competency is to present challenges that showcase Swift’s unique features. In addition to the use of optionals and generics, what makes Swift a robust language is its extensive use of protocols. In this essay, we’ll walk through an example of protocol-oriented programming.

Boats, Planes & Seaplanes
To succeed in a technical interview, one must be proficient enough with one’s language of choice to express one’s solutions with specific syntax and/or object design. …

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