Forget personal assistants, The real battle is for voice UIs
Stacey Higginbotham
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As I just posted over on Calum McClelland’s column: Hey IoT, your head is in the Clouds

Stacey Higginbotham wrote a recent post: “Forget personal assistants, The real battle is for voice UIs”

Her post points up one thing which makes the Cloud, not only important, but necessary for the Internet of Things — Voice Recognition.

Like Home Automation, I’ve played with Voice Recognition software on and off over the years — it has come a long way baby!

Today, Voice Recognition works primarily because of the Cloud. Computing Power and the Big Data combine to parse what it is that you are saying. I am a couple of years behind in this area, so I don’t know how well Google Voice, Amazon’s Alexa and Apple’s Siri are at parsing different languages and dialects, but one assumes that with a bit of training, the Machine Learning Artificial Intelligence available can easily solve that one.

Of course, if i can say, “Seri, unlock the front door,” so can the criminal who wants access. Yes, of course I am talking to my “Smart Doorbell”. Hmmm… So how does that Smart Doorbell, know it’s “me,” and ok to unlock the door, (or my wife/kids/fiancee, etc.) but not my nosey neighbor or the local hoodlum? Answering my own question — why through Facial Recognition, of course. Having to touch something to scan your finger or palm takes away the “speed” factor, and makes it no different than having to put a key in the lock. But facial recognition, such as apple does with “Faces” in its Photo application, suddenly becomes meaningful.

And since we’re on the subject of door locks — how do the Police, FBI, etc. override, by-pass, etc. — Backdoors built-in by the manufacturers, or maybe that access is inherent in the amorphous nature of the Cloud.

Security takes on a whole new dimension in the Internet of Things and the Cloud. The Computing industry has been notorious for making Accounting and Security afterthoughts, simply because it adds complexity, slows things down, and costs more in the early days of development.

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