Defecation

As I grow in my understanding of what it is like to love and accept self, I have become ever more determined not to feel restricted in allowing my thoughts to flow.

So, I want to discuss in this post, the important bodily function of defecation and the effect it has had, on my capacity to think, on my capacity to be present, on my capacity to be me.

I have been intrigued by how my body is in control of my mind at the point at which the need for defecation is present.

The feeling is so urgent and so intense and so immediate that it cannot be ignored! (and if it has to be for reasons of the unavailability of facilities etc, the discomfort and urgency increase until the urge is satisfied)

There has been a tendency, in me to consider my thoughts on a range of issues to have the same urgency for a response — to discharge an opinion, or a view, or an expression of anger — as if it was a bodily call to defecate.

I have been pondering over the journey of my intake of food through my digestive system.

I’m not a biologist, so no lessons here, but the urgency to defecate starts the previous day with the intake of food, either in solitary of in social circumstances.

The food traverses through my body and nourishes and sustains my basic needs for sustenance, but also my higher level needs to enable me to apply my skills at work, my love at home, my emotional needs to self and my spiritual needs to God.

The urgency of defecation is as a result of a journey, of a process, of a cycle which has sustained me, and this solitary act of discharge, is a culmination of something very very profound and wonderful.

No wonder then, that the immediate aftermath of defecation is one of relief and gratitude and comfort.

How wonderful it would be, if these same feelings were present after the discharge of our thoughts, our opinions our anger and our love into the world — this is only likely to be the outcome, if we consider the process of thought, as well as its discharge.

William Defoe

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