Opposing Views

My wife and I have opposing views politically.

Whenever there is an election, we walk up to the polling station holding hands and vote in our respective ways.

No attempt is made by either of us to change the others mind.

After exercising our democratic right, we usually call into the pub for a drink — summer elections in the UK are the best because it normally means a pint of beer for me and a glass of wine for my wife, in a lovely English Beer Garden.

We walk back home holding hands.

In the constituency where we live it is my wife’s political party which always wins — it is a safe Westminster seat for her political party.

My wife could decide not to vote because her party would win without her, and my vote has the appearance of not making a difference, but I believe that it does.

My vote counts as a part of the overall “share of the vote” and it gives the result of the election legitimacy for the Government whether it is of my choice or not, and also importantly, to the Opposition.

I think that an important part of exercising our democratic right is to accept the result when we find ourselves on the losing side.

To miss out on this opportunity to respect opposing views in a democracy is a recipe for anarchy.

And I speak here as a voter for “Remain” in the UK’s EU Referendum.

A majority of my fellow citizens who voted, voted for Brexit, so Brexit it is!

William Defoe

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