Written by B. David Ridpath, Associate Professor of Sports Business, OHIO University

Image for post
Image for post

Elite sports worldwide are ubiquitous and can have a major part in socio-economic advancement, public health, and entertainment for nations worldwide. Top performance at an amateur, professional or international level in sports can be a great source of pride for countries and others ranging from sponsors, media distributors and the athletes themselves. Oftentimes, the total preparedness of the elite athlete, the sound mind and body, become competing entities with athletic achievement winning out as the priority. …


Written by Diana Al-Dajani, Founder and CEO, eduTechnoz

Image for post
Image for post

Educators face daily challenges to foster Arabic readers in this bilingual, digital world, as discussed in the previous article in this series, “Modern World’s Characteristics and Impact on Arabic Literacy Education”. We need to understand the root problems crippling Arabic Literacy Education before attempting to overcome them.

Based on our workshops held in the Middle East, Canada and USA, we documented on-the-ground challenges, which paralleled in similarities across different regions.

  • Limited time is allocated for Arabic class, making it difficult to cover the mandatory curriculum in the tight time constraints. …


Written by Dr. Rebecca Winthrop, Senior Fellow and Director of the Center for Universal Education, Brookings Institution

Image for post
Image for post

Innovative is the new normal. Every sector, from banking to transportation is seeing rapid change as new technologies, connections and ideas modernize and revolutionize our day-to-day lives. Education is no exception: the way we learn is changing, from collaborative multi-grade projects in elementary school to vocational training in high schools to online tutorial videos for adults. Educators worldwide are incorporating public service, playful competitions, and video games into their daily routines. …


Written by Nico Koenig, Community Lead, P2PU

Image for post
Image for post

If you’re like me, you probably grew up thinking that serious learning only happened in school, college and university. The consequence of this belief is that it devalues, denies, and discriminates against how most of the world actually learns, which is outside of formal education. If we’re serious about achieving education for all, then we must admit that a school-centered approach ignores the vast majority of the world’s population. Fortunately, where formal education stops, public spaces are stepping up.

Often, arguments about access and education focus on formal education. For example, much discussion goes into how best to enroll more children in school and more students in a university. No doubt these are important pursuits, but they ignore the fact that the majority of the world’s population today is not enrolled in any type of formal education, and may never be. That’s somewhere between 4 and 5 billion people! This means that, given our admiration for formal education, most people today are effectively exiled from learning something that our society grants significant value. …


Image for post
Image for post

With digitization, increased globalization, and an ageing population, the world of work is invariably changing. The extent to which individuals, firms and economies can harness the benefits of these changes critically depends on the readiness of adult learning systems to prepare people with relevant skills[1].

Our last episode featured three guest speakers we met in WISE@Paris, where they shared their thoughts on the future of work and employment. Our guest speakers stressed how adaptability and agility were paramount to maintaining a successful future career.

“We estimate that there will be around 1 billion people who will need to be reskilled on digital skills in the next 12 years.” …


Image for post
Image for post

About a decade ago, few companies used the internet as a means to research potential candidates to employ for the workforce. Now, having a bad online presence is considered detrimental to a company or employee’s reputation. CareerBuilder conducted a national survey and found that 57% of employers are less likely to interview a candidate they cannot find online. Back in the day, you had no choice but to trust what an employer told you about their company. …


Written by Elizabeth Stuart, Executive Director, Pathways for Prosperity Commission on Technology and Inclusive Development

Image for post
Image for post

Edtech is a classic sellers’ market: governments around the world are desperate to make their spending more efficient and effective to drive up education outcomes. When an edtech supplier comes to them with glossy presentations and promises of wall-to-wall learning, it’s easy to be seduced that this — and only this — is the solution.

This may be a slightly cynical take but it is not far from the truth. Unfortunately, it has also resulted in instances of edtech failure in countries around the world. …


Written by Polly Akhurst, Co-Founder, Sky Schools

Image for post
Image for post

This week the UN reported that the number of people who are displaced worldwide has increased to an unprecedented 70.8 million. The average length of time each one of these people will spend in displacement is seventeen years. A great number will never return to their homes; many will live in neighboring host countries and only a very small percentage will be resettled. The only certainty for people who are displaced is uncertainty — both in their everyday lives and in their futures. Hope and resilience are both key for displaced people not just to survive but to thrive. …


Written by Aurelio Amaral, Partnerships and Policy Development Officer, World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE)

Image for post
Image for post

In a previous piece, I discussed the role of happiness as one of the purposes of education and argued that we can learn how to improve our well being. Even though it is not possible to teach how to be happy in a prescriptive way, research has found patterns that show the influence on how we feel about ourselves. Awareness about these scientific findings can assist us in changing some mindsets and behaviors for the better. …


Written by Kelsey Dalrymple, Education in Emergencies Specialist

Image for post
Image for post

Buzzwords and phrases come and go, especially in humanitarian response. They are in every report, every article, and are what every donor looks for in a proposal until the entire industry turns its attention to the next hot topic. Transformative, sustainable, community-based, participatory, empowering; the list goes on and on. Some stick around as best practice, while others fade and get replaced with new catchy terms.

One word that has floated around the humanitarian community for years is resilience. Ironically, one way to interpret resilience is the ability to bounce back or last for a long time — which many buzzwords and phrases do not. More related to the human condition, resilience is often defined as the ability to overcome hardship and achieve well-being in the face of significant adversity[1]. …

About

WISE

World Innovation Summit for Education | Building the Future of Education | An initiative of Qatar Foundation

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store