The Sad State of Product Design and Innovation in Healthcare
Doctor as Designer
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I’m a product designer with a background in mechanical engineering, and a foreground of years of working on diagnostic devices, albeit none in invasive diagnostics or drug delivery, at least not so far. (Side note: I test positive for 20+ allergens as tested on the skin. Nothing dangerous. But I know how difficult allergies can be to live with). There are several products out there with poor design, or bad technology, or both, across industries. I have to guess that the Edi-Pen is where it is, because it was designed with speed to market in mind years ago, which should not be conflated with incompetence, which is just as good a reason. Then it was certified and approved by FDA. After which there is simply no incentive for them to change or get any better, unless there is competition. There probably isn’t enough interest from those who have the money and/or capability, because this (Patients with threatening allergies) simply isn’t a big enough market worth their investment. If it is, and money, and test facilities, are not a constraint, I would love to have a shot at making a better delivery system.

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