Idioms from head to toe!

Many figurative expressions in English refer to parts of the human body. You’ve already got all the body parts, so here are some new ways to use them — in your writing! Let’s take it from the top…

1. Have your head in the clouds: Be lost in fantasies or daydreams

He thinks selling non-fat water is a good business plan because he has his head in the clouds.

2. Let your hair down: Behave freely and without inhibitions

Even Zen monks can let their hair down sometimes!

3. Play something by ear: Do something without a fixed plan

“I’m completely deaf, so I just play everything by ear,” said the composer Beethoven.

4. Keep your chin up: Remain cheerful when things are difficult

“It’s hard to keep your chin up when your head keeps falling off,” Nearly Headless Nick complained.

5. Get something off your chest: Confess your problems

“Doctor, there’s something I need to get off my chest,” said the patient to his therapist.

6. Get a pat on the back: Receive praise and appreciation

After shoving the Olympic gold medalist off the podium, the silver medalist insisted it had only been an encouraging pat on the back.

7. Give your right arm for something: Want something very badly

I’d give my right arm to be a great guitarist!

8. Be the bee’s knees: Be highly admired

Nobody but an English student would think Shakespeare is the bee’s knees.

9. Get cold feet: Feel too nervous to carry out a plan

The Abominable Snowman had sworn to eat all the mountaineers — but in the end he got cold feet.

10. Dip your toe in the water: Cautiously try something new

“You know, I invented the wheel just to dip my toe in the water — my actual plan was to invent a spaceship,” said Neolithic man.