Learn about the historic hunt for the German battleship Bismarck during World War 2!

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CHASING THE BISMARCK

During World War I, the German empire was one of the Central Powers that lost the war. A half-century of land consolidation, the emerging of the empire, the efforts of the Iron Chancellor, and the outcomes of numerous wars of the second half of the nineteenth century were literally wasted. At the end of the war, the German empire disappeared. After a number of revolutions, a new Germany had been born as the Weimar Republic. It lost all of its colonies and about 10% of the mother country, distributed amongst the six victorious nations. Being formally German territory, the Rhineland…


Learn about the world’s first modern battleship!

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You’ll often hear how HMS Dreadnought made every other battleship obsolete overnight, when she was launched in 1906. That’s because this is not too far from the truth.

The effect she had on naval engineering was so important that this ship’s name is now synonymous with the ship type that would dominate the seas for decades, serving as the basis for the largest and most powerful battleships in history. In Portsmouth, on February 10th, 1906, the era of the Dreadnought began.

History

During the late 1800s, the main principles of naval tactics revolved around old methods of close-range formation combat, with…


How the soviets raced to increase their tonnage.

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Knyaz Suvorov

History

After the end of the Russo-Japanese War, in which the Russian Navy lost nearly all of its capital ships, there was an apparent need for new ones to be built. By the spring of 1906, information about the characteristics of the state-of-the-art (Dreadnought) ships, then under construction to service the needs of the Royal Navy, had already spread. During a number of Special Council meetings convened by Navy Minister Birilev in April 1906, questions were raised about the need to build ships that would meet or exceed the power of the foreign projects in development. As a result of these…


Heavy cruisers of Project 69: four were planned, two were started, but ours was completed and sent to sea.

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During the summer of 1937, the Soviet government made a number of important maritime policy decisions. On July 17, 1937, an Anglo-Soviet naval agreement was signed to define the qualitative limitations for the major categories of ships. On August 13/15, a government decree was issued initiating the revision of the Major naval shipbuilding program of 1936. The new plan called for a reduction in the number of battleships and an increase in the number of destroyers, with the fleets to be reinforced with heavy cruisers and aircraft carriers. The “Warship building plan for the Soviet Navy” was not officially adopted…


Read all about destroyer Yūdachi, one of ten Shiratsuyu-class ships built for the Imperial Japanese Navy in the 1930s.

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As with the other ships of her class, she took part in some of the most important naval battles of the Pacific Theater. Yūdachi was eventually destroyed in the Battle of Guadalcanal, but now you can take command of this famous destroyer in World of Warships!

History

The Shiratsuyu-class destroyers were built between 1933–1937. Their project was a modified version of the Hatsuharu-class ships — with these original ships having a number of drawbacks that the Shiratsuyu class improved upon. The new ships had better stability and quadruple-tube torpedo mounts which enhanced torpedo armament.

Yūdachi was the fourth ship in…


Steampunk before steampunk was cool.

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History is littered with all sorts of practical, effective, awe-inspiring, and powerful warships. But some of them are just downright weird.In this edition, we will be singling out five ironclad warships that stick out for their truly bizarre designs. But first, what exactly is an ironclad?


Wichita isn’t just a city in Kansas, it’s also one of the most decorated heavy cruisers in the history of the United States Navy.

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History

The last heavy cruiser to have entered service for the United States before the start of World War II, USS Wichita was a unique warship, and in fact, the only unit to be produced of her class. Despite her uniqueness, she will appear familiar to any admirers of American naval design due to her striking physical similarity to many US wartime cruisers, such as the Cleveland-class and the Baltimore-class. This is because all three designs were based on the same basic hull.


With the beginning of World War II, the US ships received some striking new colors

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The US Navy didn’t use camouflage in the interwar period. The ships carried the peacetime paint: the hull and superstructure were flint grey with a bluish tint; the decks of large ships had wooden planking, and the decks of the destroyers were painted in darker colors (usually dark grey).

The underwater part of the ships was painted red on top of the antirusting compound. The belt near the waterline was colored black. In the 1930s, the top parts of the masts of US battleships were usually painted white, but there were also some exceptions: for example, the roofs of the…


Let’s take a look at the history behind the WW1/ WW2 era Itlaian Crusiers.

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Eritrea

Sloop Eritrea was developed by the Ansaldo company between 1932–1934 to serve in the Italian African colonies. By her concept she was close to the French aviso Bougainville, that had been commissioned shortly prior to her. To increase her operational range, engineers installed 650-horsepower Marelli electric engines, similar to those used on Balilla-class submarines, in addition to two FIAT diesel engines. The ship’s equipment also included a hospital, workshop, and generator rooms for servicing two submarines, as the sloop was able to serve as a base for them. She also carried minesweeping equipment.

Eritrea was laid down on July 15…


Discover the story of a Dutch destroyer of the Cold War era!

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This ship became the lead ship of the second post-war series of destroyers in the Royal Netherlands Navy. She was officially classified as a submarine hunter (onderzeebootjager), but was so close to contemporary destroyers in terms of her specifications that both allies and potential opponents of the Netherlands used this designation. Friesland served in the Navy for more than 20 years and took part in a number of important diplomatic missions.

History

After World War II, the Netherlands had to rebuild their Navy from scratch. In 1948, twelve Holland-class destroyers were ordered: six were to be finished by 1952 and…

World of Warships History

Our aim is the revive and preserve naval history! Follow for the best reads from the historians behind World of Warships — the free-to-play naval warfare game.

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