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Developers often use high-end computers to work. But what if we were to tell you that it’s more advantageous to work directly in the cloud?

Developers often use high-end computers to work. Because they need to build, test, and rebuild their projects, they have high-end CPUs. Because they need everything to go fast, they have SSDs or NVMe drives. And because they need to keep tons of tabs open in their browser, they have 16GB or 32GB of RAM. That kind of hardware costs a lot — developers rarely work on a computer priced less than $1,500. But what if we were to tell you that it’s more advantageous to work directly in the cloud. Do you want to know why? Read on!

1. You will be able to spend less on your computer

OK, let’s say your company is buying you a shiny new, powerful ready for your arrival. With an Intel Core i7, 16GB of RAM and a 512GB SSD, your computer will cost about $2,400. Or maybe your company can’t afford this spec, and instead buys you a tiny but overloaded , with an Intel Core i5, 8GB of RAM and 256GB of SSD space at about $1,500… Think about it — if you got a $500 computer instead, you would still have money left over to spend for the next 2 years — in the MacBook Pro case, that works out at about $80 a month, and with the Dell XPS 15, about $40 a month. Yet for this amount of money, you can , let’s say for 40 hours per week. …


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Need some guidance for the best way to carry out test-driven development (TDD)? Read on. Here, we share some useful tips, such as how to isolate your code to simplify unit testing. We’ll also look at an important aspect that doesn’t often get tested-database-migration rollback-as well as how code coverage could prevent you from omitting testing some important parts of your code. Finally, there’s a helpful overview of property-based testing-a new way of writing tests that’s a great complement to unit testing.

Note that we will not be covering other types of tests, such as end-to-end or functional, or other xDD techniques (such as behavior DD, domain DD, or Postman DD).


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In the Elixir application we use on our platform, we utilize the Elixir library arc to manage file uploads (similar to Carrierwave for the Rails community). An interesting feature of this library is its ability to upload a file from a remote url. A basic use case is a user being able to provide an endpoint for a form rather than a file to upload. Obviously the endpoint must be public and reachable.

Recently, we noticed a lot of invalid changeset errors were occurring with the message invalid_file_path during this operation (changesets allow systems to filter, cast, validate, and define constraints when manipulating structs). …


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Mnesia is cool. It’s quite cryptic but worth the pain. Already present in the OTP framework, it’s easy to use in both simple cases and out-of-the-box replication inside a cluster. This article covers what happened when we implemented Mnesia, including the difficulties we encountered and the results we got.

Use case

At Welcome to the Jungle, we do a lot of things. We’ve built an applicant tracking system (ATS), and we have a Welcome Kit, a media platform that provides insights into employment, and a website that allows candidates to find their dream job. …


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At Welcome to the Jungle (WTTJ), we help both candidates and companies to find their way through the jungle of recruitment.

We achieve that with content creation, events, and of course search engines for jobs and employers. Companies subscribe to a yearly contract, which entitles them to have their profile on our website as well as a location for publishing their job offers.

Leveraging data for Data Science purposes is brand new here at WTTJ. At the time of writing, all visitors have access to the same experience on the website. Basically, you search for your content, such as jobs or articles, by using dedicated search engines. …


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As a web developer, you run into issues you probably didn’t know had been resolved twenty years ago. Telecommunications and the web worked in different ways for years: until recently, the former was all about latency, concurrency, and long-running connections, while the latter, with HTTP, was just about “hits” on ephemeral connections. But the web evolved rapidly, and the things that were important in telecommunications became important for the web, too.

Evolution of the web

When it began, the web (the World Wide Web) was quite simple. Servers were delivering static files, mostly HTML pages, without any kind of intelligence or personalization behind it. …

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