Repeals, Bans, and Advocates: A Normal Day on The Hill

It’s never a boring day on the Hill, but the past 36 hours have definitely been full of news:

  1. As of Tuesday, July 25, United States House of Representatives Majority Whip, Stephen Joseph Scalise, was discharged from the hospital nearly six weeks after the Alexandria shooting.
  2. On Tuesday evening, nine Republicans joined Democrats to oppose the Republican proposal to repeal and replace Obamacare.
  3. Today, Wednesday, July 26, President Trump banned transgender people from serving in the military, with the following announcement:

“After consultation with my Generals and military experts, please be advised that the United States Government will not accept or allow Transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the U.S. Military,” Trump wrote online, breaking his message up into multiple posts. “Our military must be focused on decisive and overwhelming victory and cannot be burdened with the tremendous medical costs and disruption that transgender in the military would entail. Thank you.” — Politico to which both sides of the political spectrum on Twitter engaged in the news

4. As of Wednesday afternoon, in a 45–55 vote, Senate rejected the proposal to repeal much of Obamacare with no replacement

5. “Our Homes Our Voices” is trending on Twitter, where advocates are urging for more affordable homes in the community. Only 1% of full-time minimum wage workers can afford a 1-bedroom apartment

At the very least, regardless of what side or party you are on, there is progress being made, and as Senator John McCain (R-AZ) had said:

“The success of the Senate is important to the continued success of America. This country — this big, boisterous, brawling, intemperate, restless, striving, daring, beautiful, bountiful, brave, good and magnificent country — needs us to help it thrive. That responsibility is more important than any of our personal interests or political affiliations.” 
Read McCain’s full speech on the Senate Floor here

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