UX research can serve as an organizational compass helping to direct business strategy

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Photo by Heidi Fin on Unsplash

Many companies still view hiring full-time UX researchers as a luxury, and I’m sure that if you work in this field you probably know at least one UX researcher who lost their job since COVID-19 started. Looking more in-depth into the industry trends, in the 2020 study by User Interviews about the state of UX research roughly 60% of the respondents were 25–34 years old with 78% of the total participants being individual contributors and not in managerial positions.

These numbers mean that the field is still young and we all still need to advocate for it to take it…


A few things to keep in mind when hiring and managing people in the field of UX research and analytics

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Photo by David Travis on Unsplash

Many organizations are jumping the UX research bandwagon and happily hire people from the field to join their teams and rightfully so (most people will pay more for a product or service that gives them a better experience). The discipline has been maturing in the past few years and typical openings for UX researchers may carry the title “Product researcher” “Design researcher” and “User researcher”. …


As lições que aprendi através da minha experiência pessoal ao aprender novos idiomas e trabalhar na área de UX

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Aprendizagem de línguas no espaço virtual. Foto por Pathdoc (Shutterstock)

Eu gosto de aprender novos idiomas e isso me ajuda também com o meu trabalho na área de pesquisa de usuários. Acho que meu amor por aprender idiomas vem da curiosidade natural que tenho, uma coisa muito comum entre os profissionais de UX. Durante certos períodos da minha vida aprender idiomas foi mandatório (no ensino básico e secundário em Israel onde aprendi inglês e árabe além do meu idioma materno, o hebraico) e durante outros, foi completamente por escolha própria, como quando decidi aprender português, espanhol, francês, e italiano através de cursos universitários e de aulas privadas.

Percebendo o poder…


Time to stop and think about interesting UX challenges to solve in 2021

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Photo by Volodymyr Hryshchenko on Unsplash

As we all know by now, 2020 has been a very special and weird year in many ways. On the one hand, COVID-19 made us all change our daily routines, travel less, and feel a bit more disconnected from our social circles. On the other hand, this new situation forced us to speed up digital transformation in many fields to overcome some of the new challenges. All of a sudden we started seeing new solutions for remote work, education, social gathering, and online shopping.

While we keep on experimenting with solutions to this new reality some areas still need work…


A few things to keep in mind about improving a product’s UX with AI

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Cars on a highway seen through a lens ball. Photo by author.

There is no doubt that AI has been a hyped word in the past few years, and some people claim it can ruin the experience of using digital products (watch “The Social Dilemma” for the best example).

Yet, with the right approach, AI can actually improve the experience of using digital products. If we want to understand how to do it, we need to go back to the fundamentals of UX and interaction design and go from there.
Let’s get started.

The product needs to truly help users work faster

Experts already understand that AI is the most useful when it helps humans work faster by enhancing their capabilities…


By doing the right preparation and knowing the rules of virtual networking, UX professionals can expand their network more easily than ever before

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Photo by Chris Montgomery on Unsplash

Virtual events provide a great avenue for professionals in the field of UX (e.g. UX designers, researchers, writers, etc.) to expand their professional network across different geographies irrespective of where they live in the world.
The good news is that the days when you needed to invest money and time to travel to conferences are gone, and many online conferences are either free or cost significantly less than their in-person equivalents.

If one of your primary goals for the near future is to continue building your professional network in the UX field then you don’t have to get discouraged by…


The two areas share a lot in common and knowing how to make them work together can lead to rich and actionable insights

UX researchers collaborate with analytics professionals
UX researchers collaborate with analytics professionals
Photo by Kaleidico on Unsplash

UX research and analytics are two relatively young professional niches that involve data, analysis, and deriving insights, and many people get confused about the difference between the two. I’m one of the lucky people who had the opportunity to work in both fields, and the more experience I gain, the better I understand the potential of deriving rich and actionable insights when professionals from the two areas work together towards a common goal.

First, let’s explain the difference between the two areas. Analytics professionals spend their days extracting transactional and behavioral data from databases, and analyzing data that was recorded…


Gain focus and find the right solution to the right problem using a simple table

Two hands let many pieces of Lego fall apart.
Two hands let many pieces of Lego fall apart.
Photo by Joel Muniz on Unsplash

UX projects that involve research and design require the synthesis of multiple pieces of information regarding the way users use or could potentially use products. In innovative fast-paced companies that could sometimes be a bit challenging, especially if you juggle multiple projects at the same time and need to have a process to organize your thoughts and not get lost in the details. Add to that the fact that many creative people who need to generate a lot of ideas fast are probably slightly more right-brained than left-brained(meaning, creative but slightly less organized, take this test if you want to…


How to use a collaborative approach to map the less obvious areas of your customer journey: awareness and advocacy

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A dirt road in the Laurentian mountains, QC, Canada. Photo by the author.

Customer journey mapping is a pretty standard process for product-oriented or service-oriented companies and it’s usually expected from a UX team to be involved and even lead these processes from time to time. The idea of customer journey mapping is simple, you talk to real customers who correspond to one of your personas and you let them lead you by the hand while explaining to you where they face moments of frustration and moments of delight. Ideally, you’ll prepare questions for them that will help you understand their experience along the journey of interacting with your product or service across…


Lessons learned from my personal experience with language learning and working as a UX researcher

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Learning languages in the virtual space. Photo by Pathdoc (Shutterstock)

I enjoy learning languages. I think it’s part of an inherent curiosity I have that is pretty crucial for people who work in UX research. During certain periods of my life I had to learn languages as part of my mandatory schooling growing up in Israel (specifically English and Arabic that I had to learn on top of my mother tongue which is Hebrew). In other times later in life, it was completely by choice when I decided to learn Spanish, Italian, and French using different methods that were available during these periods (e.g. university courses, private classes online, books…

Yaron Cohen

UX researcher and digital strategist, OMCP certified. Likes making music, staying active, culture, and writing. www.yaroncohen.com

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