In this 30 day challenge, I make myself accountable for learning Blender, a 3D compositing, and animating software.

After going through the Blender tutorial and pages of notes, I’m comfortable starting beginning to create an extremely simple 3D animation. In this month-long challenge, I’m inspired by the character animation in Duolingo. Each week I’ll bring some of these characters into life and document the process behind it.

In Duolingo’s Style Guide, they broke down the shape of their illustration style into several basic shapes. I wanted to start with this basic mindset as a tackle my first Blender 3D animation. The first challenge: the Duolingo mascot, Duo. My favorite mood is this one:

After doing a bit of research into the development of Duo and the illustration system, I started to break down the process.

Documenting my experience learning Blender

A whole new world of…3D. I’ve been putting this off for wayyyy too long and I’m finally going to jump into creating something every day, even if its something incredibly minuscule. After watching a 2-hour Blender basic tutorial, here are my main takeaways and things to keep in mind, especially about the interface.

What is Blender?

It is a robust open-source software that allows anyone to create from their imagination, whether it is 3D/2D animations, compositing, video editing, painting, sculpting, visual effects, various simulations (cloth, particle, fluid, smoke), 3D printing all in real-time.

Main Takeaways

The Interface is Complex but Flexible
Use only what you need, you may not need to know certain tools or shortcuts.

Next week I’ll create a simple 3D model of things I’m inspired by, including sketches or ideas I have.

In this 7 part series, I aim to redesign Hairprint’s landing page based on research. Last week I designed the website’s landing page. This week I aim to create a simple design system that helps to articulate Hairprint’s branding and tone of voice along with their website UI components.

Part 1 | Competitive Visual Analysis
Part 2 | Areas of Differentiation
Part 3 | The User Persona
Part 4 | The Mood boards
Part 5 | The Style Guide
Part 6 | The Responsive Redesign
Part 7 | The Design System

Hairprint’s current website design clearly lacks a sense of…

A new experience for a haircare website

In this 7 part series, I aim to redesign Hairprint’s landing page based on research. Last week I developed a style guide that helps me articulate the mood and direction I believe best suits Hairprint’s brand.

Part 1 | Competitive Visual Analysis
Part 2 | Areas of Differentiation
Part 3 | The User Persona
Part 4 | The Mood boards
Part 5 | The Style Guide
Part 6 | The Responsive Redesign
Part 7 | The Design System

This week I will help to articulate the design and create a simple prototype of…

A new direction for a haircare brand

In this 7 part series, I aim to redesign Hairprint’s website based on research. Last week I developed 3 different mood boards to help articulate a new market opportunity. This week I will choose one visual direction to move forward in. Let’s get to it!

Reimaging the visual language

In this 6 part series, I aim to redesign Hairprint’s web design strategy based on competitor research. In this part, I aim to craft a few mood boards that will inform the Style Guide.

Part 1 | Competitive Visual Analysis
Part 2 | Areas of Differentiation
Part 3 | The User Persona
Part 4 | The Moodboard
Part 5 | The Style Guide
Part 6 | The Responsive Redesign
Part 7 | The Design System

In my visual competitor research here is a refresh of what stood out: 1. Interesting pop-ups shapes 2. Bold colors especially…

Redefine the User Persona

This is a design series where I analyze a website user experience and propose a redesign. For the past two weeks, I’ve been doing an analysis of Hairprint’s website. Last week I highlighted the gaps where Hairprint can stand out from its competitors. This week I want to touch on the user persona based on the research I did.

Part 1 | Competitive Visual Analysis Part 2 | Areas of Differentiation Part 3 | The User Persona Part 4 | The Moodboard Part 5 | The Style Guide Part 6 | The Responsive Redesign Part 7…

Visual Areas of Opportunities with the Website Experience

This is a design series where I analyze a website and propose a redesign. Last week I highlighted visual trends from Hairprint’s competitors in the market. Today I will see where the gaps are for Hairprint to stand out from its competitors.

Part 1 | Competitive Visual Analysis
Part 2 | Areas of Differentiation
Part 3 | The User Persona
Part 4 | The Moodboard
Part 5 | The Style Guide
Part 6 | The Responsive Redesign
Part 7 | The Design System

Last week, I noted some concluding insights from my…

Direct and Indirect Visual Competitive Analysis

Following up on my previous post from last week, I wanted to tackle a redesign of Hairprint’s shopping experience. The main reason being that there was an opportunity to enhance the overall shopping experience. I wanted to take a more methodical approach in this redesign and I chose to break up my design process into six parts. In this post, I will analyze direct and indirect competitors in the market and detail some conclusions and insights that I will carry into the second area of opportunity.

Part 1 | Competitive Visual Analysis Part 2…

Clarifying the design of an existing product in the haircare market

Hero Banner of Hairprint’s Website
Hero Banner of Hairprint’s Website
Hero of Hairprint’s Website

Hairprint is a small science-driven company based in Sausalito, California. They market haircare product that differentiates itself by using purely botanical ingredients that works synergistically with the body’s chemistry to restore our original color.

“All hair is different. We call it Hairprint® for a reason. Like a fingerprint, no two heads of hair are alike. Hair can range from thin and permeable to thick and impervious and everything between.”

I really admire their philosophy towards hair care. I’ve purchased their products and while I like their formulations and love…

ying ye

Pragmatic Creative | Visual Designer | www.yingyedesigns.com

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