At Indeed, inclusion extends beyond employee resource groups and celebrations. Diversity of background, experience, and thought makes for a stronger workforce, more effective decision-making, and powerful innovation. To foster inclusion, we want to build a psychologically safe environment at every level and in every area of the business. That’s why we’re removing terminology that works against such inclusion from our codebase.

Image of five Indeed inclusion group members smiling and wearing shirts labeled “Women at Indeed” in a relaxed office setting
Image of five Indeed inclusion group members smiling and wearing shirts labeled “Women at Indeed” in a relaxed office setting

Diversity and inclusion is an ingredient for success. Leaders of Indeed Amsterdam’s Women at Indeed employee resource group (l-r): Edwin Moses, Trudy Danso-Osei, Freek van Schaik, Renske van der Linden, and Valerie Sampimon.

What does technical terminology have to do with inclusion?

Like all words, technical terms have connotations that give them immense expressive power. Some connotations are well known and generally understood. Others depend on context and are understood differently by people with varying lived experiences. The original etymology of a term often has little to do with the connotations it accrues over time. …

About

Jack Humphrey

Software developer, dad, and a lover of music, books, TV/movies, and comics. Proud to be a VP @IndeedEng. http://jackhumphrey.me

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