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Welcome to Streamr’s core dev team update for March 2020. My apologies for the delayed post, but I hope the content will make up for the wait.

For the month of March, the team has been focusing on pushing forward the final specs for the upcoming Data Unions Framework public launch. We also kicked off the much anticipated token economics workshop, assisted by BlockScience team, to start laying the foundation of what will be a multi-stage process. …


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Welcome to Streamr’s core dev team update for February 2020. This month, the team made a lot of progress on the Network and Data Unions (formerly Community Products). We recently published a blog post on a research study we conducted, with support from Wilsome, to learn more about user perceptions and expectations regarding the Data Unions (DU) concept. One of the example pilot projects built on top of our DU framework is, of course, Swash — check out their recently released roadmap for 2020. …


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Real-time search data from data union members

Welcome to Streamr’s core dev team update for January 2020. A central focus for the past few months has been on building out our Data Unions (DU) developer framework. You might have known it as Community Products in the past but we’re renaming it now to unify the terminology before a wider launch.

The DU framework is the tech stack that Swash is built on top of, in addition to the Streamr Network. There were multiple complementary components that also needed to be adjusted in order to accommodate DU such as introducing a new type of product flow creation on the Marketplace and adding some features to our p2p Network. Continuing to bring all of that together over the next four months or so is the task ahead of us. Henri recently gave an internal breakdown of where we are. …


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Members of the Streamr team alongside the Golem, OmiseGo, Quorum and Quantstamp teams at DevCon V, Osaka, Japan, October 2019

Welcome to this overview of Streamr’s ecosystem growth over 2019. This blog is intended to provide a recap of the project’s current state, share some of the major events that happened during last year, and also highlight some of the successful steps we took in order to grow the number of developers who have made a serious investment in the Streamr stack.

Let me start by asking a pretty central question. What kind of ecosystem has Streamr been trying to create? For over a year now, building Streamr’s ecosystem has been my core focus. What we’ve envisioned as a thriving ecosystem is a collection of community members, developers and project owners who have a genuine shared interest in Streamr’s long-term progress. …


Tl;dr — Community Products pilot in progress, Network global testing and improvements for Core app

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DECODE conference in Turin, Italy early this November 2019 sponsored by European Union which Streamr attended

Welcome to Streamr’s core dev team update for November 2019. Just a quick note that this will be the last monthly update for this year. Don’t be too sad though. To end the year with a bang we are planning to publish a blog post summarising Streamr’s ecosystem to-date; where we started, the progress we have made so far and what we have planned for next year. Hopefully, we can make this into an annual tradition.

Returning to the development side, I think most of our community members have seen our first public pilot of Community Products. It has been just over a month since the beta pilot for Swash was launched. Since then we have collected plenty of feedback from both users and the Swash team on how to improve Community Products — the backend that powers data unions like Swash. …


Tl;dr — Corea Network launch, Swash public release and Data Union

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Streamr at MozFest in London

Welcome to Streamr’s core dev team update for October 2019. Let’s nickname October “The release month”. If you haven’t been following Streamr’s recent updates and are wondering why, below are some of the major events that happened in the past 30 days. The Streamr project:

  • Deployed our p2p Corea Network on mainnet ahead of schedule during Devcon 5 in Osaka, on a boat with more than 100 attendees!
  • Completed our initial version of Community Products in order to integrate it with early pilots building on top of Streamr ecosystem
  • Created the first-ever public Data Union pilot with Swash app and launched it to great reception at MozFest in London, hosted by The Mozilla Foundation. …


Tl;dr — new website, new Network, more ecosystem developers

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An emulated network modelled after real-world internet latencies to mimic real geographically distributed networks.

Welcome to Streamr’s core dev team update for September 2019. If you have been following our project long enough, you might know we are reaching our second year anniversary!

Looking back at where we started and the progress we have made so far, it has definitely been a remarkable journey. In large part, the credit for this goes to you, our community. You’ve continued to trust and support us and that has allowed us to maintain our focus and consistently deliver the steps (and more) outlined in our roadmap.

As Gavin Wood mentioned during a fireside chat at Web3 Summit last month, delivering products is really hard. We are happy to announce that our next Network milestone, Corea, will be hitting mainnet very soon! …


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Santeri Juslenius drilling into Core’s potential at EthBerlin Zwei in August

Welcome to Streamr’s core dev team update for August 2019. If you’ve been keeping on top of the Streamr project’s development, we officially launched the Core app a few weeks ago.

We showed-off Core to scores of Web3 developers over Berlin Blockchain Week. Devs were impressed with the easy drag-and-drop UX, revamped design and the nearly 170 built-in modules, which conveniently allow users to interact with Ethereum smart contracts without any frontend coding.

Our developers Tim Oxley and Jonathan Wolff hosted an online webinar walking through the basic aspects of Core: how to use most popular modules, connect real-time data streams, create event triggers, deploy smart contracts on Ethereum blockchain and how to trigger them automatically. …


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Streamr Co-founder, Henri Pihkala, just after Core’s launch at the Web3 Summit in Berlin 2019, on a panel hosted by Chainlink

What happens if you create Web3 sign-in and a payments process for a data marketplace? Traditional data marketplaces, such as Thompson Reuters and Dun & Bradstreet, require purchasers to have credit cards…a business address… and so on. But with Ethereum addresses acting as both the payment facilitation mechanism and user identity verification, it quickly becomes clear that AIs, DAOs (Decentralized Autonomous Organisations), and machines can all start owning, controlling and selling real-time data.

That’s a huge deal because instead of simply being interesting experiments in consensus decision making, or curious investment vehicles, suddenly DAOs can get serious. …


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Elk Development Board

Welcome to Streamr’s core dev team update for July 2019. You’re supposed to take a break in the summer months — not us. As we approach some crucial shipping deadlines, we have seen progress on multiple fronts including Network, Community Products and the Core app.

Before jumping into our internal progress, we would like to mention that one of our IoT partners, Elk, has just launched a Kickstarter campaign. Amazingly, they reached their funding goal in less than two days. They are building a development board for blockchain and the decentralized web. Check out this awesome video on punch bag payouts which details one of the many possible use cases when merging automated crypto payments and IoT. …

About

Weilei Yu

Head of DevRel and Marketing at Flow blockchain. Prev Head of DevRel at Streamr. Vision driven and bias for action. Crypto enthusiast.

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