Ticked Off

“What we see here is a classic case of approach-avoidance behavior. When did you first start feeling this way?”
“It started this morning. My alarm went off, I opened my eyes, and then I covered my head with the blanket again.”
“What was it about the day that was troubling to you?”
“The sun came up.”
“Yes- but the sun comes up every day. What about today’s sun coming up was particularly troubling to you?”
“I knew I’d have to get up.”
“But that has not stopped you from getting up every other day…”
“Yes, but this is the first time I’ve experienced that.”
“What did you do after you pulled the cover back over your head?”
“I had left the alarm beeping, so I was angry and threw it towards the bathroom.”
“That sounds like a dramatic response. You must have been quite upset.”
“Funny how time flies.”
“Well, yes- I suppose that is true in this case. Will you need to get a new clock now?”
“Why?”
“Well, because you threw the one you have now at the bathroom.”
“Oh no- I still have it.”
“Oh good- it still works then.”
“No, it is cracked across the front face, and the digital number reads all eights.”
“Oh- well, it’s broken then. You probably need a new one.”
“I suppose you are right. And a bathroom mirror.”
“You broke the mirror also?”
“No- the clock did.”
“But you threw the clock?”
“Yeah- but I wasn’t trying to hit the mirror.”
“But it is your mirror that got hit, and that is now broken.”
“That is true. But I did not put the mirror on that wall- the builder’s did.”
“But you bought the house in its current configuration, right?”
“Yes, but I never used the mirror in the bathroom. I hate looking in mirrors. That mirror was extraneous and useless.”
“So you were awakened by the alarm, pulled the covers back up over your head because it was today- a different today than any other kind you’ve known- but the alarm would not quit going off, so you picked up and threw the clock into the bathroom, and it broke the clock and the mirror you didn’t care for.”
Quiet.
“Mr. Jones, why do you think you reacted like you did this morning?”
More quiet.
“Doc, can I take at your watch there?”
“Why do you think you reacted like you did this morning?” Doc asked, as he leaned forward and let the patient see the watch dial.
More quiet.
“Well, Mr. Jones- it looks like our time is about up.”
“Doc- it’s about time.”

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