Is unsigned Xcode giving you a hard time?

Last week I decided to try Injection for Xcode. This meant having to unsign Xcode to make the plugin load. This was a pretty straight forward process but after a bit of tinkering with code, I started noticing that the CPU went all bonkers and Xcode started beach balling.

My first thought was that Injection for Xcode was up to no good, so I decided to uninstall it, just to see. Unfortunately it seemed like the beach-ball was here to stay. To quote my favorite Looney Tunes character, Marvin the Martian: “back to the old drawing board”, in other words, firing up Google.

After a bit of searching I stumble across an issue on Xvim (another plugin for Xcode), which shared the symptoms that I was having.

Right after I click on the editor, my Activity Monitor shows a tccd process taking around 50% of the CPU usage.
So I investigate on this and it seems to be linked with the authorization to access the user's AddressBook. 
So I went to System Preferences->Security & Privacy->Contacts and uncheck Xcode.app. Then, I restart Xcode and it works like a charm !! \o/

Xcode 8 hangs as soon as I click the code with the mouse #966

So if you are having these kind of issues, this is definitely worth a try, hope it helps!

Kudos to Frédéric Ruaudel for finding a solution for this!

UPDATE

Seems like the solution mentioned above will not solve all cases.
But not to worry, while doing some more investigation I came across another GitHub thread that I’d like to share with you guys.

I found a better way for when Xcode/XVim has the spinning beachball when started first time: Just let it run until tccd has finish. Use top(1) and sort-order (press O) -cpu to monitor.
When the first time you run Xcode, it verifies the checksum. So when you strip and resign, it needs to verify the checksum. However this time it does do it without a progressbar, which is very annoying.

Xcode 8 Freezes on Launch #969

Cheers Edwin Groothuis 🍻

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