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There’s a reason for the “clueless bisexual” trope.

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Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Here’s the issue with being a bisexual or a lesbian woman: it’s very hard to tell if another woman is interested in you, or even gay at all. Most of our pop culture is focused on interpreting heterosexual signs between men and women, like a lot of arm-touching or direct eye contact. Far less is on how to tell if women like you if you’re a woman to begin with, or how to learn to interpret those signs as romantic interest rather than casual friendship.

As a useless bisexual who has been very clueless on more than one occasion, here are the signs that — in hindsight — were glaringly obvious that a queer woman might be into you. …


She sells us the fantasy of the French Girl stereotype — for Americans.

Actor Lily Collins, who plays the titular Emily in Paris, on a pink background with a thought bubble with Eiffel Towers in it
Actor Lily Collins, who plays the titular Emily in Paris, on a pink background with a thought bubble with Eiffel Towers in it
Image created by author in Canva, image of Lily Collins via STEPHANIE BRANCHU/NETFLIX

I scoffed, laughed, and groaned my way through all ten episodes of “Emily in Paris” over a 5 hour period as I flew to Germany. But I can’t deny why I was so enchanted by it — it’s simply that I wish I was Emily.

It’s shameful, but it’s true. Her bland personality allows me to insert myself easily into her shoes, living my fantasy life of moving to a new foreign city, and becoming that charming, cool, and funny girl with very little effort.

There’s no denying it’s popular and will no doubt be picked up for several more series — perhaps we’ll get Emily in Berlin next year, with a similarly laughable collection of German stereotypes and a brave American woman who’s admirable work ethic and dedication to having fun shows those stolid Germans how to live, all the while seducing men and eating wursts. …


I didn’t do a single traditional pitch.

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Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

September marks the first month I started seriously freelancing full-time, pitching clients, ironing out workflows, and producing work for someone other than myself. It was scary, fun, exhilarating, and confusing. It challenged a lot of my assumptions about freelance work, and it reinforced others.

This article walks through how I earned $6821.48 this month from my first month of freelance work, what strategies helped me along the way, and what I plan to do to stabilize and ideally increase my monthly revenue.

1. Writing for other individuals: $1050

This is the newest and most exciting source of income — ghostwriting and brand journalism for other people. My biggest client came to me through a recommendation from someone else, which was a reminder that networking exists and is valuable for writers as much as any other industry. …

About

Zulie Rane

Full-time writer & cat mom. She/her.

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