📸 — Copenhagen, Denmark

Wrapping up our Scandinavian tour (Norway, Sweden & now Denmark!) we continued to think the weather would be cool. I mean, we are so north that summer must be chill and enjoyable but boy were we wrong.

At the furthest point North we’ve been (in Tromsø) the weather was on average 32 degrees each day… I mean people would always go and swim in the arctic circle during the summer months but with this kind of heat, it is actually way more enjoyable!

Sweden was suffering from major forest fires out of the main cities while we were there as they haven’t had rain in weeks. Now in Denmark, the heat followed with a bit more intensity with 35–37 degree days as we were walking about.

Because of this, most of our touring happened later in the afternoon which was great as the sun doesn’t set until 10pm/11pm anyways. But also made drinking some great craft beer that much more enjoyable!

Mikkeller Brewery is one of Olivier’s favs and they are from Denmark. They have over 14 locations in the city and we enjoyed many afternoons on the patios or in the air conditioned space drinking a great IPAs and sour ales.

But the heat was probably the worst during our transit from Stockholm to Copenhagen. The air conditioning on the train was broken and with all those people sitting on the train.. with no air circulation… made it a very long ride. Kind of reminded us of that train ride we took in Morocco through the desert.

After a week in Copenhagen, some highlights could be the bikes, the buildings and enjoying all the Hygge — “ Hygge is as Danish as æbleskiver and it goes far in illuminating the Danish soul. In essence, hygge means creating a warm atmosphere and enjoying the good things in life with good people. The warm glow of candlelight is hygge. Cosying up with a loved one for a movie — that’s hygge, too. And there’s nothing more hygge than sitting around with friends and family, discussing the big and small things in life. Perhaps hygge explains why the Danes are some of the happiest people in the world.”

So in short… we spoiled ourselves with amazing food markets, great company and great scenery.

See more on our website www.alittledetour.ca🌏✈️👫
Airbnb life.
It rained the night we arrived, and Maeghan felt inspired.
Cooking a little, but mostly turning up the Hygge.
Maeghan has had McDonald’s in more than 30 countries and is really proud of it.
Lego was created in Denmark and Maeghan’s sisters told her to go.

LEGO is kind of like IKEA in the sense that they own this place.. you can go on a LEGOLAND tour, and HQ Lego tour that lasts 2 days and you stay at the LEGOHOTEL — all for the small fee of $3,000!

They are huge!
A round tower that you can go to the top of, they have no stairs.. just a slanted spiral walk.. and a small stair case (20 steps) to get to the look out point… but it was so hot, that people looked like they were going to pass out squeezing through the small space from heat exhaustion.
Bike culture. Its cool, they have carts for people to sit in on the front, or seats converted from skateboards — it was awesome.
City hall.
So many skate parks and places for kids to hang.
we witnessed a peaceful protest — regarding a new law that just came into effect, essentially banning burkas in public. Seeing both supporting and opposing sides through out the city.

“Freetown Christiania, also known as Christiania, is an intentional community and commune of about 850 to 1,000 residents, covering 84 acres in the borough of Christianshavn in Copenhagen.

Christiania has been a source of controversy since its creation in a squatted military area in 1971. Its cannabis trade was tolerated by authorities until 2004. Since then, relations between Christiania and Danish authorities have been strained. As of 2018 cannabis trade is on going and the danish police officers are in place and do not allow the use or trade of other drugs like cocaine and heroin.” — Wikipedia

That place was wicked. It’s a community that is separate from the Danish society, operates by their own rules. It’s the hippy social experiment pushed to it’s full extent. Walking around, and seeing the houses that people have built for themselves on this beautiful patch of land was super interesting. And as you can imagine, you get to meet quite a few colourful characters walking around this place!

No photos past this point — this is the beginning of “Pusher street”. It’s essentially like a farmer’s marker, except half of the kiosk have a wide variety of marijuana for sale!
People living on the water.
A happy camper — great food, beer and sun.
There are a lot of things to do in Copenhagen that revolve around parking lots.. or industrial areas. Some of the best bars/pubs/restaurants are in these types of areas!
Mikeller by the water!
One of the street food places was grilling pork outside like this. You could smell it from very far away — this is not fair competition.
Container street food market— so awesome!
Mushroom truffle pizza and beers for the win!
Bike culture.
War Pigs — two breweries came together to make a texan style joint with great beer!
Vlogging about the dudes doing the Half-Pipe.
We walked by this statue every day and every day thought it was a real dude taking a leak on the wall.
Last night in Copenhagen, we made some Californian friends!

When we left Denmark, we ran in to a few random obstacles. First off, the website wouldn’t let us reserve our ticket, so we had to go to the ticket office. The clerk accidentally booked our tickets for the wrong date, so we didn’t have assigned seats on the 6 hour train.

The train’s air conditioning was broken, Maeghan’s fan broke, and we had to jump from seat to seat as reserved passengers took priority of their spot.

Then we got to the water where Denmark and Germany meet… and our train.. boarded a ferry….. like it detached two carts, and drove onto the boat… we rode on a cruise for 45 min… and then drove off the boat… and were in Germany.

So now, we’re heading to Berlin!

6 hours of misery in a furnace on rails
See more on our website www.alittledetour.ca🌏✈️👫