Bland will only get you so far

Josh Manning
Sep 21 · 5 min read

Why a new generation of “blands” needs to rethink how they challenge.

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Even a flamingo, amongst flamingos, is unremarkable

Blands. That’s what Ben Schott, writing for Bloomberg, coined them. And what a coining it is.

The new generation of humble, conscious, in-it-to-sell, underdog companies, sporting D2C models, consumer champion narratives, minimalist aesthetics, affordable luxury positionings and post-choice selling techniques (this is THE mattress, that is THE toothbrush).

They would consider themselves disrupters. But disruption ebbs and flows, dictated by technological, legislative, political and demographic factors. We see a cycle, moments of rapid and extreme disruption followed by periods of incremental improvement until the next big breakthrough that sees business models or products reimagined yet again.

Steve Jobs, having streamlined Apple in the 90s is famously quoted, when asked what his next move was, as saying “I’m waiting for the next big thing to come along”. And so he did. Twice. First with the iPod and then with the iPhone.

And when that jump comes along? Massive competitive advantage. But it must be enjoyed while it lasts, because, without the next breakthrough, the chasing pack inevitably catch up, to the point where, in this example, Apple, Samsung, Google, Huawei, Oppo and every other smartphone brand you can think of all look to one-up each other through incremental improvement. Advantage slowly, or not so slowly, melts away.

What we’re seeing at the moment, is not particularly disruptive. It is not massive upheaval but spread. A proliferation of companies, across all kinds of categories, leveraging the big business model breakthroughs of the last decade — the share-economy, marketplaces, digital aggregation, D2C, or indeed a combination of these. From an innovation perspective, there no longer seems to be a single trailblazer. Rather, they come in packs. In rapid succession, Australia has been hit by multiple meat replacements, neo-banks, kombuchas, online lenders, non-dairy milks, craft breweries and healthy fast-food chains.

The problem is, this is the second-generation, not the pioneers. They are not the Ubers, AirBnBs, Dollar Shave Clubs, Netflixs or Warby Parkers of the world. They can no longer rely on their business model, consumer-centricity or democratisation rhetoric to set them apart. These are now table stakes. What the second generation has failed to realise, is that the pioneers grew not just on customer-centricity or a business model, but on actual, meaningful difference in market — something we’re so often reminded is so rare nowadays.

And so, with no real, or at least easily discernible, product, business model or customer experience advantage, and without creating a distinctive identity, the second generation has become bland. All stating that they’re ripping up the rule book when they’re all touting the same models, the same words, the same look, and the same story.

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A few of the blands highlighted by Ben Schott, in his article ‘Welcome to the Bland New World’ for Bloomberg

If you’re hearing this and are getting a sinking feeling that your brand may be a bland, don’t worry. Because what makes a bland is a matter of approach.

Bland is born of the idea that copying the successful will inevitably result in success. From a business model perspective, this can be true. Plenty of successful businesses run on the same business model as their competitors. From a product perspective, it can also be true. Many companies have succeeded — and even become category leaders — while having a product that is very good but not much, if at all, better than their competitors.

But you cannot copy your way to brand success. Because as soon as everyone starts spruiking the same philosophy, look and feel, customer experience, tone and story, it ceases to create distinctiveness, perceived difference or emotional connection between consumer and company.

These companies may have gained a share of consumers' wallets — hoovering up long-hanging fruit in early adopters — but, for the truly ambitious amongst them, looking to build something that is more than a flash in the pan, how far this copy and paste approach will take them is extremely debatable. No company in history has grown by blending in alone. And, even if you are in it to sell, standing out from a brand POV is a surefire way to get ahead of the chasing pack early and make yourself a more attractive proposition for potential investors well ahead of the competition.

If you could copy your way to brand success, every D2C mattress company would be growing just as fast as Koala. Or all the neo-banks would see just as much success as Up (currently Australia’s second fasted growing bank). These brands are fantastic examples of the fact that where there is less in the way of business model or product differentiation, a distinctive brand becomes an incredibly powerful weapon.

What the blands chasing the likes of Up and Koala have done, rather than create a distinctive brand, is adopt all the traditional challenger tropes. They are challenging by formula. But, challenging cannot, by definition, be a formula. Because formulae create norms and norms aren’t challenging. When everyone’s a challenger, it becomes the status quo. Even a flamingo amongst flamingos is unremarkable.

Each and every bland is one expansive thought away from separating themselves from the pack. The kind of thought that takes them off formula. That takes them to a place, not just the big players but, their fellow blands haven’t, won’t, or cannot go.

It might be tackling your biggest competitor head-on, changing the basis of choice for the category or finding that minute, overlooked, but important detail in the customer experience that you can own and amplify. It might be playing the class clown, the nerd, or the awkward kid with growing pains. It may still mean taking on the category, but in a different, more authentic way. The one thing we know it isn’t is pastel pink.

So, to all the blands out there, my question is, will you take that step and do brand differently? Will you create your own identity? Mean something others do/will/can not? Will you add a bit of colour to a bland world?

A Little West of Centre

The slightly off-beat musings of a strategist living in Sydney’s Inner West.

Josh Manning

Written by

A marketing and communications strategist from Australia. Musings at A Little West of Centre.

A Little West of Centre

This is a blog full of the slightly off-beat musings of a strategist living in Sydney’s Inner West. It may, or may not, include opinions on how brands, advertising, and marketing work, and their role in the world.

Josh Manning

Written by

A marketing and communications strategist from Australia. Musings at A Little West of Centre.

A Little West of Centre

This is a blog full of the slightly off-beat musings of a strategist living in Sydney’s Inner West. It may, or may not, include opinions on how brands, advertising, and marketing work, and their role in the world.

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