Children Are More Attracted to Their Peers — Parenting Guide

However, peer relationships can also play a negative role in social-emotional development. Therefore, it is important for parents to be aware of their child’s peers.

Afzal Badshah, PhD
A Parent Is Born
Published in
3 min readJan 13

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Photo by Victoria Akvarel : https://www.pexels.com/photo/woman-man-and-girl-sitting-on-snow-1620653/

Children look less to their parents and more to their peers for learning. Peer relationships provide a unique context in which children learn a range of important social-emotional skills, such as empathy, cooperation, and problem-solving skills. However, peer relationships can also play a negative role in social-emotional development. Therefore, it is important for parents to be aware of their child’s peers and their activities and observe them on a daily basis.

When I was in primary classes, I used to go to school with some of my friends. With these friends, I also learned some good things that I still remember and I am sure that these good habits must have been taught to them by their parents. But one day, on our way to school, we began talking about homework. We still had homework to complete. There were quite harsh consequences back then. The oldest of us all advised that we hide from school today in order to avoid punishment. We retreated from the school gate. We could not go back home at this point. We were required to spend this time outside, where no one could see us.

We hid in the bushes alongside the road because we were worried no one would notice us. We were frightened that someone would kidnap us because there was a phobia of children being kidnapped back then. We worked hard outside all day and returned home after school time. However, we never made another move like it after that. The reason for drafting this remark is that children face a lot of peer pressure and can make any decision under this pressure.

Photo by Brooke Cagle on Unsplash

I have noticed that children establish groups based on their routines and try to stay in those. Because of peer pressure, this relationship is quite strong. Under such pressure, they are ready of doing anything. Children in the positive group are well-behaved, while children in the negative group often ignore their parents and teachers.

Do you know a child who grew up in a good family but became a negative member of society because of bad peers?

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Read more about parenting

Parenting and Schooling-A Comprehensive Guide​

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Afzal Badshah, PhD
A Parent Is Born

Dr Afzal Badshah focuses on academic skills, pedagogy (teaching skills) and life skills.