New Exhibit of Jeff Koons, Cecily Brown, Charles Ray & More

The best shows to see this week in NY. We pick only 3.

Highlight: Haegue Yang at Greene Naftali Gallery (Grene Naftali Gallery)

1. Jeff Koons, Cecily Brown & Charles Ray
@ The FLAG Art Foundation
January 20 — May 14

Jeff Koons’ 1988 “Winter Bears” (FLAG Foundation)

Featuring artworks from three major contemporary artists, FLAG’s exhibit addresses ideas of youth, nostalgia and intimacy. The curation contrasts Cecily Brown’s abstracted, kaleidoscope-like paintings — which explore desire and sexual pleasure — with Jeff Koons’ and Charles Ray’s unique approaches to material, scale and surface when creating sculpture works. However, while Koons investigates the relationship between humanity and youth, Ray’s pieces take a broader perspective on juvenescence, examining its historical importance.

On view at 545 West 25th Street, New York, NY.

You can also find works from Jeff Koons for sale on artlist.co

2. Haegue Yang @ Greene Naftali 
March 4 — April 16

(Green Naftali Gallery)

In her second solo show with Greene Naftali, “Quasi-Pagan Minimal,” Haegue Yang presents sculptures and drawings that complicate her career-long investigation of the alienating effects of globalism with an awareness of folklore and cultural tradition. Through her abstract minimalism, Yang blends modern industrial and capitalistic influences with elements of cultural distinction and memory. Her works allows the two contradictory aesthetics to collide, as if traces of culture are fighting for their place amid the alienating whitewashing of modern society.

On view at 508 West 26th Street, New York, NY.

3. Justin Berry @ Essex Flowers
March 4 — April 10

(Essex Flowers)

Justin Berry’s new exhibition, entitled “Photographs,” walks the fine line between lived reality and technological fantasy. Although his photographs may seem lifelike or real, they are actually composed of screen captures or independent images — often more than a hundred combined to create a final composition. Thus he has created worlds that could never exist in reality, although on first glance we may guess that the did. The pieces speak to society’s larger conflict between lived truth and virtual reality.

On view at 54.5 Ludlow St, New York, NY.


This post was written with the help of Alice Mahoney, from www.artlist.co

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