The Way You Read Books Says A Lot About Your Intelligence, Here’s Why

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This is why the smartest people in the world own tons of books they don’t read.

If you love to read as much as I do, walking into a bookstore as an adult feels exactly like walking into a candy store as a kid.

The shelves are lined with the wisdom of humanity, insights that each author has spent years refining. It’s all right there at your fingertips, condensed into a format that you can curl up with.

So naturally, you pull out your credit card or press the ‘Buy Now’ button.

And the books pile up. On your shelves. In your bedroom. In your car. Maybe even your bathroom.

The most dedicated book addicts find space where there was previously none:

Source: http://bit.ly/2JRrqbk

And as the books pile up, so does your guilt. Guilt at not reading all of the books you buy. Guilt at not finishing the books you start.

If this describes you, I have good news for you.

“Even if you do not have the time to read them all, overstuffing your bookshelf or e-reader is good for you.” Jessica Stillman

As I will explain in this article, for people who actually put in the time to read and learn how to learn, unread books strewn across the house might actually be a sign of intelligence rather than the lack of it.

Not only is having tons of unfinished books around a sign of smarts, it also puts you in great company. I finally let go of my own guilt when I did a deep dive into the reading habits of luminary entrepreneurs and informally surveyed my most successful friends. Most of them only read

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Michael Simmons (blockbuster.thoughtleader.school)
Accelerated Intelligence

I teach people to learn HOW to learn / Serial entrepreneur / Bestselling author / Contributor: Time, Fortune, and Harvard Business Review)