Top 4 topics on Chinese social media last week

AllChinaTech brings you the four most talked-about topics last week on Weibo, one of China’s largest social media networks.

#4. Eating dirt to survive (19.5 million views; 33,000 comments)

The Double 11 shopping frenzy ended with consequence. Weibo users cried over the fresh holes burnt through their wallets. A new term “eating dirt to survive poverty” has emerged online — an exaggerated expression used to describe how broke shoppers have become. Weibo users posted what they had bought along with the term in order to commiserate with other users in shared poverty!

#3. The e-commerce buyers show (55.8 million views; 69,000 comments)

Online shoppers in China like to gossip about what they’ve bought. More importantly, they love to post the shocking photos of their shopping disappointments. The photos serve as a warning to other prospective shoppers, helping them to avoid being tricked by misleading advertisements. Posters typically include before and after-type photos with their posts.

#2. Snowy Forbidden City (99.6 million views; 139,000 comments)

Heavy snow last week gave Beijing a fresh new look, or you could say, returned an old one. It reminded people of the old days when Beijing was still Peking, a century ago. Thousands of Beijingers couldn’t resist the temptation to take a glimpse at the snowed-in Forbidden City. Many rushed to the scene to witness firsthand, the spectacular sights and later posted some amazing photos to Weibo.

#1. Red carpet at the Golden Horse Awards (710 million views; 311, 000 comments)

The results of the 2015 Golden Horse Film Festival and Awards in Taipei were announced last Saturday. Weibo users seemed to have most been attracted by the fashion display as seen on the stars. Some were praised for their eye-catching dresses, and others were mocked. With so many beauties flocking to the scene, whose dressing was to your taste?

(Numbers of page views and comments were counted on Sunday)

Follow us on Facebook & Twitter!


This list is piled by AllChinaTech’s guest writers Toni Tang and Stella Yu.

Originally published at www.allchinatech.com on November 29, 2015.