Gooey Bacon Apple Pie

I’ve accidentally become “known” for this pie. Ever since I saw it on Reddit years and years ago, I’ve been baking it for every holiday, every time someone comes to visit, and sometimes, just because.

Since I get asked for the recipe so often and it’s soooo easy to make, here’s my recipe I’ve adapted over the years, along with a few tips and tricks to make sure it’s perfect every time.

Gooey Bacon Apple Pie Recipe

You will need:

  • About 1 pound of Granny Smith Apples — you can use any apple you want, but I find that Granny Smiths have the right consistency and flavor
  • Bacon — About 10 slices, depending on width. Splurge on “good” bacon. Get that applewood-smoked, thick-cut, expensive deliciousness. Totally worth it.
  • A 9-inch deep dish pie crust — yeah, I know. I hate making pie crust so I buy frozen ones. If you wanna make your own, more power to ya!
  • 1 cup of sorghum molasses —this is what makes this pie “gooey” and oh-so-delicious. The molasses makes this pie just melt in your mouth! You can substitute about 3/4 cup of brown sugar instead, but it won’t have the same level of goo. Oh, and if you use brown sugar, you can decrease the amount of cornstarch needed. Since molasses isn’t as sweet as brown sugar, you can add a bit of brown or white sugar in addition to the molasses if you have a real sweet tooth.
  • 4 tablespoons of cornstarch — if you use brown sugar instead of molasses, you can cut this down to 2 tablespoons. You can also use flour, but you‘ll need to use at least 4 tablespoons and it decreases the “goo level.”
  • 3 teaspoons of Pumpkin Pie Spice — so maybe this is cheating a bit too. I’m okay with that. If you don’t have any PPS on your hands, 1/2 teaspoon of nutmeg (take it easy with that stuff), 1 teaspoon of cinnamon (I love it so I usually add 1 and a 1/2 tsp), 1/2 tsp of cardamom, and 1/4 tsp of ground cloves (easy on those too!!) will do the trick.

You will NOT need:

  • butter or Crisco — do not add any butter or lard to your pie filling! The bacon grease is going to serve this purpose perfectly.

What to do:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Set your frozen pie shell out on a cookie sheet. This cookie sheet is very important and should be sturdy with tall sides.
  3. Start peeling and slicing those damn apples. Seriously, this is the hardest part of this whole operation. If anyone wants to get me something for Christmas, an apple peeler/corer would be awesome! Thin slices are best.
  4. In a large bowl, mix your apple slices with the molasses, pumpkin pie spice, and cornstarch. Keep mixing until all apples are coated in delicious goo. This is a good time to do a taste test and make sure it’s sweet enough for you.

5. Dump that delicious apple goo into your deep dish pie crust.

6. Now, the fun part — weave that bacon over the top! Leave the bacon strips long, hanging over the edge of your pie, since they will shrink as they cook. Watch the video for more tips

7. Place your pie shield around the edges to keep them from burning (construct your own pie shield with aluminium foil if you want) and put the pie on the cookie sheet onto the middle oven rack and bake at 350 for about 1 hour. That cookie sheet is important to keep the bacon grease from dripping into the bottom of your oven! I learned this the hard way.

8. Remove your pie shield and bake for about another 15 minutes.

9. Remove that sucker from the oven and let it completely cool. I know it’s tempting to cut right into it after the wonderful smell has enticed you, but trust me, let that pie goo solidify a bit.

10. Enjoy! Add some vanilla ice cream on top or, if you want to make a breakfast out of it, a slice of cheddar cheese on top is to die for!

Need more bacon in your life? I’ve seen some recipes that cook some bacon first, crumble it, and add the crumbles into the apple pie filling before baking. I’ve tried it this way and it was good, but I prefer just to keep the bacon lattice.

Up next, Great-Grandma’s Coconut Pumpkin Pie. I hate coconut, but love this pie. It’s that freakin’ good.

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