Learning How to Learn: A Critical Life Skill

Nick Soderstrom, Ph.D.
Age of Awareness
Published in
4 min readDec 17, 2018

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Photo by Agence Olloweb on Unsplash

Knowing how to facilitate durable and flexible learning has never been more important than it is today. Our complex, hyper-competitive, and rapidly changing world requires that we obtain or transmit new skills and knowledge as efficiently and effectively as possible, not only during our years of formal education, but across our lifetimes as jobs, careers, and interests change. Adapting successfully to these challenges requires a critical life skill: learning how to learn. Whether you’re a high school teacher, college student, or parent of a young child, understanding and applying evidence-informed learning principles is necessary to optimize learning in the classroom, at home, in the workplace, or on the practice field.

The problem is that learning how to learn has never been a priority in our educational system. Students are taught what to learn, but not how to learn. Consequently, most students carry with them numerous misconceptions about how learning works and, therefore, often make poor decisions about how to study. This can lead to profound challenges and frustrations for students, especially in college where students are expected to take responsibility for their own learning.

Teachers, too, are inadequately trained on how the science of learning can be leveraged to enhance their educational practices. Consider the report, Learning

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Nick Soderstrom, Ph.D.
Age of Awareness

Nick is a cognitive psychologist with an expertise in human learning and memory and has been recognized for his excellence in research and teaching.