Private Jets And Coffee

Michael Nabert
Age of Awareness
Published in
6 min readJan 22, 2022

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Say farewell to your simple pleasures.

This photo came from Pexels

I’ve never flown on a private jet, and I will certainly never own one. I’m totally okay with that. My ambitions are less materialistic. But we take the distribution of private jet travel as a given: to the obscenely wealthy, the private jet is normal, and to the rest of us, it’s utterly unobtainable.

It’s clearly not practical for everyone to have a private jet. If we somehow mass produced them for half the population, emissions would be gargantuan.I’d personally prefer that we used those resources to get people with urgent skills and knowledge where they are most needed for the betterment of our civilization. Quality mobile response for natural disasters would be better use for it than fulfilling the idle whims of a sociopathic plutocracy. Sadly, that isn’t on the table.

When there’s only so much private jet travel to go around, we let the super rich have it, and the rest do without. That’s our civilizational norm.

At least there are other, smaller luxuries that most of us can access. Like a great cup of coffee.

We seriously love our coffee.

For most of human history, having a foodstuff that can only be grown in distant regions of the world transported many thousands of miles to provide you with a steady supply of it was unthinkable to anyone but the most powerful monarchs. Today, modern supply chains allow the average American to drink two cups of coffee a day (2.7 per day for the average Canadian). It is the most widely used stimulant in the world, a common social lubricant with an established set of traditions and social conventions surrounding its widespread consumption. We’re highly dependent on its power as morning go-juice to get people wakeful and out the door, or we delight in it after a great meal. It’s a pleasure available to most. A homeless person in my town sees virtually no luxuries in their life, but the largesse of a random person on the street may at least afford them a satisfying cup of joe now and again.

But our world is changing at ever increasing speed. Coffee thrives best in specific conditions, and a warming world is making places that used to be ideal for coffee growing less hospitable. Growers of our favourite bean are…

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Michael Nabert
Age of Awareness

Researching a road map from our imperilled world into one with a livable future with as much good humour as I can muster along the way.