Reclaimed wool: the revolution we want to live

Ethitude
Ethitude
Mar 19, 2017 · 5 min read
IAIOS: The revival of the traditional pullover. A 100% recycled jumper, made in local factories.
  • Classification: the fabrics collected are separated by similar qualities and colors. The classification is purely visual, creating stacks until there is enough to put in the press.
  • Shredding: once classified, the leftovers are shredded to get the “fluff”.The “fluff” is the material that emerges after the shredding process, some kind of wool fluff.
  • Color: In order to find the right color, combinations of different proportions of fluff in different tones are tested.
  • Rest: once the desired tone is found, the fluff is dampened and left to rest before putting it in the spinner.
  • Spinning: the moistened fluff is placed on the spinner from which the wick comes out. This wick is twisted in order to create the reels of yarn to then weave.
  • Weaving: With the reclaimed wool reels, the garments are woven as it would be done with new wool. With the advantage that this reclaimed wool is more resistant in general, it has not involved dyes or other added chemicals.
MUJI introduced imperfect dried shiitake mushrooms in the early 1980s, at a time when perfectly round dried shiitake were preferred by the Japanese market. We skipped the shape-sorting step during manufacturing, in order to make expensive dried shiitake affordable. The reclaimed wool collection we launch this winter uses leftover fibres and scraps generated during the manufacturing process. Reclaiming materials that can be reused not only eliminates waste, but also keeps prices reasonable. Imperfect shiitake and reclaimed wool; two products which embody the MUJI concept of ’no frills, high-quality products’.
IAIOS — The return of traditional sweaters: http://www.iaios.org/shop-online

Age of Awareness

Stories providing creative, innovative, and sustainable changes to the education system

Ethitude

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Ethitude

Blog on sustainable fashion and responsible consumption www.ethitude.com

Age of Awareness

Stories providing creative, innovative, and sustainable changes to the education system