Sarah Made Her Mother Laugh Before She Could Even Talk and It Was Magic

Making someone laugh seals the deal in the development of attachment

Martha Manning, Ph.D.
Age of Empathy

--

Photo by Jimmy Conover on Unsplash

“A baby crawls into a bar…”

My daughter, Jen, Facetimed me from Sweden this morning. I was immediately panicked because she couldn’t catch her breath enough to speak. In the background, I heard new sounds from my nine-month-old granddaughter. I’ve heard her coo and gurgle and giggle. But this was full throated laughter. It was loud and fluid, almost melodic.

Jen appeared on the screen and gasped, “Thank God you picked up!” Heavy breathing… heavy breathing. I was alarmed.

“Mom, I’m gonna pan over to the play pen.” She was beside herself with broad laughter. I was puzzled, but relieved. I’d been ready to call the Swedish Rescue Squad.

She finally zeroed in on little Sarah, who was pressing her face into the fine mesh screen of the play pen. Her chubby little face smushed into one hilarious image after the other.

Baby comedian

By itself it wasn’t all that funny. But she was doing it on purpose. She didn’t just make my daughter laugh. She almost made her incontinent. When my daughter exploded in a new round of laughter, Sarah crowed.

--

--

Martha Manning, Ph.D.
Age of Empathy

Dr. Martha Manning is a writer and clinical psychologist, author of Undercurrents and Chasing Grace. Depression sufferer. Mother. Growing older under protest.