How the US Is Destroying Young People’s Future

The war on youth is real.

Luay Rahil
All Things Work

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Smiling student with agenda between books in house
Photo by George Milton

I work with people whose ages range from 20 to 70. Interestingly, those in their 70s seem happier than those in their 20s.

In the 275-year history of our country, for the first time, a 30-year-old man or woman is not economically better off than their parents. This may not seem like a big issue, but it indicates a breakdown of our society's social fabric and economic contract. The contract stated for 100s of years: if you work hard and play by the rules, your kids will be better off financially than you, which is no longer true.

This breakdown is causing a lot of anger, shame, and disappointment in our youth and their parents. Take Amanda, for example. At 30, she is married with two children and lives with her parents because she cannot afford to purchase her own home. Additionally, she is still repaying her student loans. How can Amanda find happiness in this situation while trapped in a horrible economic cycle?

I'm not alone in my observation, as many new studies highlight Generation Z is the most unhappy generation in history. If you don't believe me or the studies, spend time with a 20-year-old and see for yourself.

The oldest person in Generation Z, born between 1997 and 2012, is 24. This generation faces challenges…

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Luay Rahil
All Things Work

I write engaging content on business and leadership development.