Shoulder Replacement

Total shoulder replacement, also known as total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), is a tremendously successful procedure for treating the severe pain and stiffness that often result at the end stage of various forms of arthritis or degenerative joint disease of the shoulder joint.

The primary goal of shoulder replacement surgery is pain relief, with a secondary benefit of restoring motion, strength, and function.

Need For Shoulder Replacement :
Doctors recommend joint replacement surgery when shoulder pain and loss of function become severe and when medicines and other treatments no longer relieve pain.

Surgical Procedure
The surgery involves replacing the humeral head (or joint “ball”) and the glenoid (called the “socket”).

Anatomy of the shoulder area, depicting the implant
after surgery. Partial shoulder replacement (or hemi-replacement) may also be indicated with certain severe shoulder fractures of the humeral head. This technique requires the replacement of that component only.

  • Either regional anesthesia with interscalene block or general anesthesia is used for total shoulder replacement arthroplasty. During the operation, the patient will be sedated and unconscious, positioned in a “beach-chair” position.
  • There are many different types of implants that are used for shoulder replacement. They all, however, share the same basic components: a metal ball that rests against a plastic (polyethylene) socket. The goal of shoulder replacement is to remove the patient’s arthritic humeral head, replace it with the metal “ball” component with a stem that extends down inside the patient’s humerus (upper arm bone), and then place a plastic socket over the surface of the patient’s own glenoid.
  • The surgeon begins by separating the deltoid and pectoral muscles, accessing the shoulder in a largely nerve-free area to minimize nerve damage. The shoulder is covered by the rotator cuff, which must be opened by cutting one of the anterior (front) rotator cuff muscles. This “opens the door,” allowing the surgeon to view and manipulate the arthritic sections of the shoulder.
  • After the arthritic sections have been removed, the surgeon inserts the implant socket, ball, and stem components; closes and stitches the rotator cuff muscle; and stitches and cleans the incision.

Complications Linked With the Surgery :

  • Shoulder Stiffness
  • Instability
  • Infection
  • Nerve Damage
  • Glenoid Loosening

Benefits Associated :

  • Reduces pain.
  • Restore mobility in patients with end stage shoulder arthritis, and occasionally after certain severe shoulder fractures.

Treatments

  • Ankle Fusion
    Ankle fusion is usually very successful in relieving arthritis pain, but it also reduces the ankle’s motion. To make up for this, nearby joints may move more — which increases their risk of developing arthritis in these joints. Read More…
  • Ankle Joint Replacement
    Total ankle replacement (also called ankle arthroplasty) is a surgical option for patients with arthritis of the ankle. This operation can relieve pain and maintain motion in the arthritic ankle joint and is an alternative to arthrodesis (ankle fusion). Read More…
  • Knee Replacement
    The Knee is the largest joint in the body. Normal knee function is very important to perform day today activities. Knee is made up of the lower end of thigh bones (femur) which rotates on the upper end of the shin bone (tibia) and the knee cap which slides in a groove on the end of the femur. Read More…
  • Knee Arthroscopy
    An arthroscopy is a type of keyhole surgery that is used both to diagnose problems with the joints and to repair damage to the joints. The procedure is most commonly used on the knees, wrists, elbows, ankles and shoulders. Read More…
  • Minimally Invasive Knee Replacement
    There are two ways to perform a total knee replacement: The traditional approach and the newer minimally-invasive (sometimes called quadriceps-sparing) approach. Read More…
  • Anterior Cruciate Ligament
    Surgery for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries involves reconstructing or repairing the ACL. ACL reconstruction surgery uses a graft to replace the ligament. The most common grafts are autografts using part of your own body, Read More…
  • Hip Replacement
    A total hip replacement (THR) — also called a Hip Arthroplasty- is a surgical procedure that re-forms the hip joint. In THR, the head of the femur (the bone that extends from the hip to the knee) is removed along with the surface layer of the socket in the pelvis. Read More…
  • Shoulder Replacement
    Total shoulder replacement, also known as total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), is a tremendously successful procedure for treating the severe pain and stiffness that often result at the end stage of various forms of arthritis or degenerative joint disease of the shoulder joint. Read More…
  • Carpal Tunnel Surgery
    The carpal tunnel is a narrow, tunnel-like structure in the wrist. The bottom and sides of this tunnel are formed by wrist (carpal) bones. The top of the tunnel is covered by a strong band of connective tissue called the transverse carpal ligament. Read More…
  • Hallux Valgus-Bunions
    A bunion (also referred to as hallux valgus or hallux abducto valgus) is often described as a bump on the side of the big toe. But a bunion is more than that. The visible bump actually reflects changes in the bony framework of the front part of the foot. The big toe leans toward the second toe, Read More…
  • Nerve Grafts
    Nerve grafts are used when a patient has a nerve injury resulting in complete loss of muscle function or sensation. A nerve graft is a surgical technique in which a segment of unrelated nerve is used to replace or bridge an injured portion of nerve. Read More…

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