Shania Twain (via miaminewtimes.com)

WUNDERKAMMER! #31

Hiya :)

This week’s edition of WUNDERKAMMER! represents the first time that I have missed a week, since I began this series back in April —oh, how the mangy have fallen.

The reason is simple: Last Friday, I celebrated the release of my second EP.

Musicians often compare releasing new music to the act of childbirth.

Apart from this being horribly insulting to the physical suffering endured by generations of mothers, I also feel that it glosses over the important fact that the newest one is always our favourite. With children, in my experience, it is nearly always the reverse: Parents prefer the first child most, and all others are pale imitations of that first great milestone (shout-out to my younger sister ❤).

Anyway, with this week’s excuse-making out of the way, allow me to gather up some somethings that had my attention this week:


  1. SELFIE. By far-and-away the most insightful thing I read this week (and something that I’ve been waiting on for months) is Rachel Syme’s piece on selfies.
    When I first came across her thoughts on selfies via Twitter, I hadn’t really spent much time thinking about selfies. Quickly though, I became interested in the relationship between selfies and ideas of self-representation, image-making, etc.
    I even co-opted some of those ideas into my own awkward (read: fun to write, weird to read) piece about artist & image.
    She does an excellent a job of writing seriously and sincerely, without undue solemnity, and for that (and a host of other reasons) her writing is interesting and vital.

2. Medici. I’ve just started watching this docu-series about the Medici family of Renaissance Florence. It seems kinda cliché to talk about the art of the Renaissance at the moment; I mean, we all get it — they made great art — but it feels so familiar and obvious that it becomes uninteresting.
Mercifully, these documentaries (which are a little cringe-worthy, production wise, at times) instead discuss the mechanisms by which the Renaissance came about; how it was financed; and the philosophical & political motivations for the Medici’s patronage.
I’d also forgotten how soothing art-history documentaries are, sooooo…


3. Shania Twain. Yes. Sometimes my mind wanders away from its usual hangouts, and I re-discover something I haven’t thought about in years. Christ knows what dredged this up from long-term memory, but I’m enjoying it immensely.


4. Buster Keaton. One of my favourite video-essayists took on one of my favourite film-makers & actors. There was almost no chance that I wouldn’t enjoy it; and — even if you’ve never heard the name Buster Keaton before — I’m sure you will too.


5. Me. OK, so this’ll likely be the last time I mention this for a long while, but for those who are interested, I did release a new EP of music last week. It was nothing like childbirth, but there was some definite crying involved.

Have a good weekend! ❤

CROOK

WUNDERKAMMER!’ is the German word for that great 16th / 17th century European idea of the ‘Cabinet of Curiousities’: a collection of interesting / rare things that the rich would display to their guests as a sort of conversation piece.

That’s what I want this to be, too: A conversation piece. I’ll happily show you mine, but I’d also love to see what interests / provokes your imagination & intellect. If you’d like to share something interesting / unusual with me, you can write a response directly, below — or, hmu on one of the other places I hang out (also below).

Ask me unreasonably personal questions here:

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