#lra15 Maker stuff and spaces with some literacy stuff

Ian O’Byrne:

We need to open up publishing by connecting to the #indieweb

Christina Cantrill

Has playdough, pipecleaners, and rubber bands for us to make and play

Amy Stornaiuolo

Phil Nichols<

Phil then moves into finding publics as a part of making
There are different ways to finding publics. The more authentic the student driven the audience the more motivation

Phil Nichols

For some students doing thing you have to do for school was their only resonation. The audience was still the teacher

Amy Stornaiuolo

Greg McVerry

I am using noterlive.com to live blog from #lra15 session on making

Amy Stornaiuolo

Publics as “opportunities” to participate.
making publics is not about the space. #makerspace are not inherently liberating. Need to account for histories.
the promise of makerspaces has to be read through the history of schools

Phil Nichols

making publics is about relevance. Students have to find publics meaningful. Authenticity is not universal

Jessica Parker

who are the maker educators?
We have ten years of maker as a label and it was from a corporation and ignored youth culture.

Jessica Parker:

The Maker Certificate Program is three mini-courses 50-seat hours. They turn in a maker portfolio. Open to tangible.
We send you a maker kit such as paper circuitry and then ask people to reflect on their making. They define making.
We host our classes in K12 makerspaces.
juxtaposition of rapid prototyping and slow looking.
80% of the attendants were 80% teachers. It was heavily skewed K-8. High school was math, science, digital media, art
40% of the educators were over 40 and 55% had taught more than 11 years, 23% over 20 years.
79% all self reported that their families were makers.

Greg McVerry:

this is interesting. Yet if they were reporting as being from a making family was the program already reaching makers

Jessica K Parker:

Cardboard and glue gun, and hand tools were in the top four (3d printer) was third. Low barrier of entry.
The teachers are saying it isn’t a binary. Making is not low tech or high tech.
teachers self reported that building agency was the greatest benefit of integrating maker education.
26% reported that engagement, fun, and excitement were the greatest benefits.
another theme was valuing process & iteration
#lra15 @jessicakparker: collaborating, tinkering, reflecting on their work, prototyping were the best benefits noted by teachers.
time, space, money, materials and support were the greatest challenge
This isn’t unique to makerspaces. This is true for any initiative.

Antero Garcia:

escaping from teacher pd through games and game design
This primarily going to be a story propelled by an engine of teacher inquiry
there are six elements associated wtih #connectedlearning but we need a racialized lens to look at it.
two assumptions: there are powerful learning when playing digital games, people can be pretty terrible to each other
think about #gamergate #sxsw so I use the metaphor of a table.
this took place in Schools for Community Action
principles: schools need to be student centered, innovative, community collaboration, social justice, and sustainability
teachers called it an escape from PD
I used storium an online storytelling game. Created cards based on different roles of participants.
the PD was in an escape room. You have an hour to get out of the room.
In June they hosted the game jam. Could make traditional or digital games.
Game jamming is a professional practice. At schools its hard. You have to modify to make sure they were over by 5:00pm
Students note that there is space for critical reflection, and student and teacher growth.
The students came together when students were shot. It is really hard to be in a game based environment in this context
how are teachers given the space and time to read the contexts of classrooms and communities?
How is the ecosystem of (de)professionalism being challenged?

Christina Cantrill:

As you know we (NWP) are a peer based educator community and we are increasingly working w educators outside of school
NWP came together when teachers realized they had to write themselves. I see this (1970s) as the beginning of making
We jumped in and claimed writing as making.
What are the ways we communicate. We use a broad sense of what is writing.
In thinking about this discussion we wanted to think about you all.

Greg McVerry:

Signing off now to go make.

Originally published at INTERTEXTrEVOLUTION.

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