Bring the Advice From Your Military Mentors to Work

The people that led us in the military through the various stages or our career, our peers, and our subordinates all gave us a wealth of information how to be and become better leaders and more skilled at our military duties. Their advice was meant for us our entire career as opposed to just the date their advice was given.

1. Advice From My Platoon Sergeant in Korea — A Leader Listens More Than They Talk. My platoon sergeant in Korea when I was in the infantry was everything I was not: experienced respected, proficient and liked by everyone. He led by observing, coaching, and quietly directing the entire platoon in a way that made everyone feel that they were doing it themselves and not being told. One early morning, during a difficult training mission in January when the temperature was well below zero, he simply said, “Sir, just listen and then give the orders.” Great advice from 1990 that I still use today.

2. Advice From My Battalion Commander at Fort Campbell, KY — Always Lead From the Front. My Battalion Commander during my days at the 101st Airborne Division was a simple guy — simply be the best in what you do. Even though you will not always know every answer, you should always be out front leading the team to make sure the solution is practical, immediate, and effective. Today, this always reinforces the point that whatever the issue or initiative my team always needs to see me out in from leading the way.

The Rest of the Story — https://communities.usaa.com/t5/Going-Civilian-Blog/Bring-the-Advice-from-Your-Military-Mentors-to-Work/ba-p/68164

** Content provided courtesy of USAA **

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