That one guy from that place talks about that thing

I stand here today, grateful for the diversity of my heritage, aware that my parents’ dreams live on in my two precious daughters. Let us be our sister’s keeper. The fundamentals we use to measure economic strength are whether we are living up to that fundamental promise that has made this country great — a promise that is the only reason I am standing here tonight. For more than sixty years they have endured the pain of dislocation.

He was a good-looking kid, six two, six three, clear eyed, with an easy smile. Let us keep that promise — that American promise — and in the words of Scripture hold firmly, without wavering, to the hope that we confess. Fear that because of modernity we will lose of control over our economic choices, our politics, and most importantly our identities — those things we most cherish about our communities, our families, our traditions, and our faith.

Wright deliver a sermon called “The Audacity of Hope.” And during the course of that sermon, he introduced me to someone named Jesus Christ. Universities and states, including Illinois, are taking part in a divestment campaign to pressure the Sudanese government to stop the killings. Segregated schools were, and are, inferior schools; we still haven’t fixed them, fifty years after Brown v. America, this is one of those moments.

His father — my grandfather — was a cook, a domestic servant to the British. And then another one. The dream of opportunity for all people has not come true for everyone in America, but its promise exists for all who come to our shores — that includes nearly seven million American Muslims in our country today who enjoy incomes and education that are higher than average. And I am hopeful that all countries in the region can share in this goal. Many Gulf States have enjoyed great wealth as a consequence of oil, and some are beginning to focus it on broader development.

If there’s a senior citizen somewhere who can’t pay for their prescription drugs, and has to choose between medicine and the rent, that makes my life poorer, even if it’s not my grandparent. “People began to shout, to rise from their seats and clap and cry out, a forceful wind carrying the reverend’s voice up into the rafters….And in that single note — hope! — I heard something else; at the foot of that cross, inside the thousands of churches across the city, I imagined the stories of ordinary black people merging with the stories of David and Goliath, Moses and Pharaoh, the Christians in the lion’s den, Ezekiel’s field of dry bones. The Republican nominee, John McCain, has worn the uniform of our country with bravery and distinction, and for that we owe him our gratitude and respect. If your hopes have been dashed again and again, then it’s best to stop hoping, and settle for what you already know. We are taking concrete actions to change course.