Apollo Corner
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Apollo Corner

My thoughts about Twitter’s new fleets feature

Twitter recently launched a new feature similar to Instagram and Facebook stories

Starting at least a few hours ago, I’ve been able to use Twitter’s new fleets feature, which operates similarly to the stories feature on Instagram and Facebook, on the Twitter app for my Amazon Fire tablet. As of this writing, the fleets feature is not available on all platforms where Twitter can be accessed; for example, the fleets feature is not currently available on Twitter’s website, at least on the Google Chrome browser for Windows.

I have a generally positive opinion of Twitter fleets so far, although the name of the feature seems awkward.

One thing I like about Twitter fleets is that fleets on Twitter are, in my experience, easier to create than stories on Instagram. There is a 30-second limit on videos for Twitter fleets, although, if you go over the 30-second limit, splitting the video into multiple fleets of 30 seconds or shorter is relatively easy. Fleets are, if they operate similarly to Instagram and Facebook stories in this regard, presumably no longer viewable or accessible after a certain period of time.

However, I find the name of the feature, fleets, to be awkward. While the name “fleets” rhymes with tweets, the short messages which are Twitter’s signature feature, I could imagine whoever runs the U.S. Navy’s Twitter page telling an admiral that he or she sent a bunch of fleets via Twitter, only for the admiral to mistakenly believe that he or she used Twitter to send naval fleets into combat instead of sending out a bunch of short-lived messages promoting the Navy on Twitter.

To my fellow Twitter users, happy fleeting!

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Aaron Apollo Camp

Aaron Apollo Camp

23 Followers

Openly-polysexual author and aspiring poet from the American Midwest