5 Music Podcasts

A Musical Life with Hugh Sung

Hugh Sung is a classical collaborative pianist. He enjoys ‘pretty much anything thrown his way’. You can learn more about his musical and entrepreneurial activities in this episode of his podcast: a musical life.

“I created AML podcast because initially I was looking for podcasts to promote my online piano school. When I saw that there weren’t that many shows available to talk about teaching or making music, I decided to make my own.

A Musical Life is a podcast created to share stories about making music and the things that move our souls. Every Monday, new episodes introduce listeners to fascinating musicians and musical ideas from a wide variety of genres and styles.”

Bobby Owsinski’s Inner Circle Podcast

“In this show, music industry guru Bobby Owsinski gives you his personal insights into the industry of music covering industry news, reviews, analysis and tips as well as offering an amazing interviews with prominent industry movers and shakers every show! If you know Bobby, you know you are in for an enlightening and engaging treat. So enjoy the show!” (iTunes)

Classical Classroom

“There’s a rumor going around that classical music is hoity toity. At Classical Classroom, we beg to differ. Come learn with classical music newbie Dacia Clay and the music experts she invites into the Classical Classroom.”

“Houston Public Media classical music librarian, Dacia Clay has a secret: she knows next to nothing about classical music. But she wants to learn! Luckily, she’s surrounded by classical music experts every day. In each episode of the Classical Classroom, Dacia’s colleagues and some local classical music luminaries take turns giving her classical music “homework assignments”. You’ll learn about everything from bel canto aria to the use of leitmotif in the score to Star Wars. Come learn with us in the Classical Classroom.”

Ep. 156: Words And Music, With Dale Trumbore; Music and poetry go together like inhaling and exhaling, or like gasoline and matches, or like Sherlock and Watson, or like Parker and Stone, or like a hammer and a nail. Et cetera, et cetera. In this episode, composer Dale Trumbore talks about setting poems and prose to music, and about the relationship between poetry and music. There are exercises within, so get out your paper and your pencils.

Ep. 153/154: Music Of The Coen Bros. Films, With Craig Cohen. “Welcome to our holiday indulgence: a walk through the music of the Coen Brothers films with Craig Cohen of Houston Matters. We pick up our where our last conversation ended (with 1994’s The Hudsucker Proxy), and move on to the sparse music of Fargo. Hear a little Mozart, a fake bluegrass band, wind used as an instrument, and even the vocal stylings of an X-Wing fighter pilot.”

Music Of The Coen Bros. Films, With Craig Cohen. Part 1
Music Of The Coen Bros. Films, With Craig Cohen. Part 2

Ep. 33: Cracking “The Nutcracker” — Michael Remson and Shelly Power. “We all know The Nutcracker, right? Wrong! In this episode of Classical Classroom, Shelly Power (director, Houston Ballet Academy) and Michael Remson (executive director, AFA) blow your minds with the history of the ballet and a behind-the-scenes look at the massive undertaking that putting on the show entails every year.”

Soundtracking with Edith Bowman

“In a unique weekly podcast, Edith Bowman sits down with a variety of film directors, actors, producers and composers to talk about the music that inspired them and how they use music in their films, from their current release to key moments in their career. The music chosen by our guests are woven amongst the interview and used alongside clips from their films.” (iTunes)

Song Exploder

“A podcast where musicians take apart their songs, and piece by piece, tell the story of how they were made.”

“Song Exploder is a podcast where musicians take apart their songs, and piece by piece, tell the story of how they were made. Each episode is produced and edited by host and creator Hrishikesh Hirway in Los Angeles. Using the isolated, individual tracks from a recording, Hrishikesh asks artists to delve into the specific decisions that went into creating their work. Hrishikesh edits the interviews, removing his side of the conversation and condensing the story to be tightly focused on how the artists brought their songs to life. Past guests include Björk, U2, Iggy Pop, and Carly Rae Jepsen, among many others. In 2016 the Sydney Opera House hosted Song Exploder as an artist-in-residence. The show has been featured at the Sundance Film Festival and SXSW.”

La-La-Land — “The film LA LA LAND tells the story of Mia, an aspiring actress played by Emma Stone, and Sebastian, a jazz pianist played by Ryan Gosling, both of them struggling artists in Los Angeles. The musical was written and directed by Damien Chazelle in collaboration with composer Justin Hurwitz. It’s the third film they’ve made together, the follow-up to the Oscar-winning film Whiplash. In this episode, Justin Hurwitz breaks down a song from the film sung by Emma Stone; it’s called Audition (The Fools Who Dream). Plus, some thoughts from Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, who wrote the lyrics.”

Iggy Pop is a pioneer of punk rock, whose legendary career began over fifty years ago. In 2015, he began collaborating on music with Joshua Homme, of Queens of the Stone Age. The result was Iggy Pop’s 23rd album, Post Pop Depression. In this episode, Iggy and Josh break down the song “American Valhalla,” and tell the story of how it was shaped by reverb, opera, and the military.

In 1996, Josh Davis, aka DJ Shadow, released his first album, Endtroducing. It’s been hailed pretty much universally as one of the best albums of the 90s, and Time Magazine included in its top 100 Albums of all time. It changed hip-hop and electronic music, and helped define the trip-hop genre. Now, for the 20th anniversary of the release, DJ Shadow breaks down the song “Mutual Slump.”

What (music) podcasts do YOU listen to / watch? Comment or email rupert@cheekypromo.com

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