Arachnews: July 2019

Neville Park
Aug 6, 2019 · 8 min read
A mud dauber hovers behind a Micrathena orbweaver’s web.
A mud dauber hovers behind a Micrathena orbweaver’s web.
A mud dauber hovers behind an orbweaver in her web. Source: Jen Cross.

Art & Social Media

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  • Spider balloon art! Extra points for identifying the spiders.
  • Via Reddit, a curious case of an orbweaver anchoring its web with a hanging pebble. Though there are some spiders that are known to lift up rocks with their silk, this isn’t one of them. The rock was probably on the ground, then got lifted up by the tense web. (It will probably take video footage to settle the matter.)

Education & Outreach

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The story of №16 went viral. Source: CSIRO.

Research Reported

Research & Observations

Ecology & Inter-Species Interactions

A pseudoscorpion clinging to the leg of an alpine longhorn beetle
A pseudoscorpion clinging to the leg of an alpine longhorn beetle
A pseudoscorpion found clinging to the leg of an alpine longhorn beetle in Italy. Source: Zaragoza et al. 2019.
A female marsh fritillary butterfly.
A female marsh fritillary butterfly.
The endangered marsh fritillary butterfly. Source: Wikimedia.

Arachnid Bodies

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The two basic types of female spider genitalia. Source: Uhl 2009.

Silk

Footage of a Darwin’s bark spider spinning its remarkable web. From the BBC’s The Hunt.

Miscellaneous

Taxonomy

New species

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Wedoquella apnnea and Wedoquella karadya. Source: Rubio et al 2019.
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The newly described Epeus triangulopalpis. Source: Malamel et al. 2019.
A male peacock jumping spider with vivid red, orange, and sky-blue stripes.
A male peacock jumping spider with vivid red, orange, and sky-blue stripes.
Meet Maratus occasus. Photo by Michael Duncan. Source.

New records

Miscellaneous

A small brown and red tarantula in an enclosure
A small brown and red tarantula in an enclosure
Homeomma chilensis, the tarantula also known as H. bicolor and Euathlus sp. “red”. Source: Wikimedia.

Thanks to Sebastian Alejandro Echeverri, Ivan Magalhaes, and Catherine Scott for their contributions and feedback. Corrections, ideas, and items for next month are welcome! Leave a comment or drop us a (silk) line on Twitter at @arachnofiles.

Arachnofiles

Arachnids are fascinating.

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