Views from an adolescent female

Woman. We tend to come in different forms. Different shapes, sizes, and colors. We have an infinite amount of characteristics. Some we determine, however, most are determined for us. From the day a female is born, she is labelled. Whether she is tall, short, skinny, or big. No part of her, neither mental nor physical, remains unjudged. When I am born, I am treated in so many different ways. Some treat me like a gift, or a blessing. Others treat me like I am a burden. Not being a boy, I am weak, and I am not considered equal to one.

Then, like any human being, I grow. My body changes. I form something that sets me aside from others; I form my own identity. My own opinion. I start to meet other girls just like me. Soon, I enter the very institution that will further change me. It will cause me to break, but will inadvertently build me. It is the very institution that will decide what route my life takes. I become a member of the institution. Every day I learn not only something new about life around me, but also of myself. My strengths, my weaknesses, my likes, my dislikes. I also meet new people. Some will look at me as if I am someone important to them, someone we call a friend. Others, on the other hand, will look at me like I am the very pleasure they need to take out their imperfections on.

Slowly, I begin to look at the mirror more. I look at not what is beautiful about me, but what others say out loud; whether it be the hair on my skin, the acne on my face, or the way my body is shaped. Nothing is left or spared from their comments. Slowly, as they say more and more, things matter much less. Things become less influential. Words hurt less. I develop something new that somehow gives me strength. This new encouragement, I call confidence.

Step by step, I start looking in the mirror. Things start to become crystal clear. I see a whole new me. I see my imperfections, but hidden within me, I see my true, inner beauty.

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