Authority Magazine
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Authority Magazine

“5 Things We Need To Do To Close The Gender Wage Gap”, with Anne Shoemaker and Candice Georgiadis

I advise the women I work with to ask for a big raise for a few reasons: a) I hope they get it, and b) if they don’t get it, I want them to get as much information about how their compensation is determined as possible. If the company is unwilling to share a salary band for their position, I encourage an open dialogue about advancement opportunities. If a woman learns that she is already tapped out at her current employer, that is good information to have- it might be time to polish up the resume.

  1. Attention from pop culture icons (bottom-up approach), such as Michelle Williams’ 2019 Emmy speech and Megan Rapinoe of the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team, Sports Illustrated’s 2019 Sportsperson of the Year (only the 4th female ever to win the honor in 66 years). Speaking of a worldwide stage, it would be hard to find an American or international soccer fan (the world’s #1 sport) who did not witness Megan Rapinoe & the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team win a record-setting fourth World Cup in 2019. Her decision to snub the White House in favor of advocating for women’s equity garnered plenty of attention. Rapinoe is boldly trying to start a movement by inviting influential males into the process as well (see: Lionel Messi, Cristiano Ronaldo)
  2. Committee chairpersons/sponsors (preferably male) at the state and federal regulatory levels and/or ongoing sponsorship on this issue by an influential male business leader. The week of Dec. 16th, 2019, former President Barack Obama made remarks about the benefits that women in leadership positions bring to the world stage. While his remarks were not about pay equity, they do cast a light on the benefits that women bring to decision making and seats of power. To close the gender wage gap, we need influential men to advocate for women’s pay equity.
  3. Coaching of women and girls of all ages to become more skilled in self-advocacy. In hiring babysitters, I am struck every time a young woman (typically high school age) responds to my compensation question, “What’s your rate?”, with “Whatever you want to pay me is fine! 😊” No, no, no! We need to counsel young women to start their rate with confidence: “I charge $12/hour for two kids”. Bam- done. When we start our careers off with a flippant “Whatever”, we start the habit of discounting our skills and our worth. This cannot continue.
  4. Pay transparency to eliminate asymmetrical information. In my coaching practice, I advise the women I work with to ask for a big raise for a few reasons: a) I hope they get it, and b) if they don’t get it, I want them to get as much information about how their compensation is determined as possible. If the company is unwilling to share a salary band for their position, I encourage an open dialogue about advancement opportunities. If a woman learns that she is already tapped out at her current employer, that is good information to have- it might be time to polish up the resume.

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Candice Georgiadis

Candice Georgiadis is an active mother of three as well as a designer, founder, social media expert, and philanthropist.