“5 Things We Need To Do To Close The Gender Wage Gap”, with Bianca Caban of Republic

Candice Georgiadis
Dec 6, 2019 · 8 min read

Maternity leave inequality. After men have a baby, their salaries typically go up while women’s go down. In fact, fathers’ salaries increase by 6% after a baby, on average, while a mother’s salaries decreases by 4%. If men are mandated to take paternity leave and salaries remain equal upon return, it helps alleviate the wage gap since women don’t have to carry full burden of being out of workforce.

As part of my series about “the five things we need to do to close the gender wage gap” I had the pleasure of interviewing Bianca Caban. Bianca is Managing Director, Partnerships at Republic / CEO of SheWorx. Her previous experience includes banking and investment at Credit Suisse, Blackrock, and Atlas Merchant Capital. She co-founded Taino Capital, AccessLatina and earned her bachelor’s degree at Harvard and MBA at Columbia.


  1. A lack of transparency. Compensation committees should be created, whose job it is to review compensation across an organization in an effort toward transparency. Reporting and regular assessment will indicate what needs work. While it may be radical to ask companies to publicly disclose salaries, regular review structures help to understand results and have a basis from which to improve. We saw that with our own company’s diversity numbers, in fact. For example, we didn’t know how much of our capital went to female founders until we made a concerted effort to start tracking it so we can hold ourselves accountable. I’m pleased to report that 40% of all investments on Republic go toward female founded startups.
  2. A lack of mentorship and education for women early in their careers is also causing the wage gap. The pay gap starts early on and can be traced back to women’s first jobs — men negotiate the first job and women don’t. Women should seek out mentorship around negotiating strategies since they are not negotiating salaries from the beginning, which compounds over the years. We need to better equip women at an early age (college-level) with the knowledge and tools for effective negotiation.
  1. More recognition of women for the work they’re doing. For example, this year’s Forbes 100 Innovators list profiled only one woman out of 100 innovators, prompting the editor to admit a miss. Women deserve equal recognition for equal work.
  2. More positive and body positive images of women in business. Audrey Gelman, the CEO and cofounder of The Wing, was the first visibly pregnant CEO to appear on the cover of a business magazine. She decided to appear visibly pregnant to show other women that they too can simultaneously run a business and start a family. These images of women are incredibly important to destigmatize and empower women who choose to have children while maintaining a career.
  3. More transparency about compensation. While this may be a drastic example, Seattle-based ice cream chain Molly Moon’s announced wage transparency this past Equal Pay Day. If companies don’t want to go as public with wages, they should at least establish internal compensation committees to regularly review compensation to ensure equality.
  4. Men need to take paternity leave. To level the playing field, if men take the same leave that women do, women won’t feel “behind” when returning to work and equality will remain. Data shows that after the birth of each child, when women leave the workplace, they see their earnings drop by 4% while new fathers receive a 6% bump or greater. By mandating that new dads take paid leave when they have children could not only help to destigmatize the act of doing so for both men and women, but also, it can go a long way in reducing the gender pay gap by relieving women of the full burden of childcare and from having to take the full time away from work.

Authority Magazine

Leadership Lessons from Authorities in Business, Film, Sports and Tech. Authority Mag is devoted primarily to sharing interesting feature interviews of people who are authorities in their industry. We use interviews to draw out stories that are both empowering and actionable.

Candice Georgiadis

Written by

Candice Georgiadis is an active mother of three as well as a designer, founder, social media expert, and philanthropist.

Authority Magazine

Leadership Lessons from Authorities in Business, Film, Sports and Tech. Authority Mag is devoted primarily to sharing interesting feature interviews of people who are authorities in their industry. We use interviews to draw out stories that are both empowering and actionable.

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