“5 Things We Need To Do To Close The Gender Wage Gap”, with Megan McCann, CEO of McCann Partners

An Interview With Candice Georgiadis

Candice Georgiadis
Jan 13 · 11 min read

Recommend women for internal career opportunities — Studies show that women are less likely to apply for a position if they don’t feel like they qualify or haven’t completed all the requirements. Internal business leaders need to keep this in mind and remember to recommend qualified women when positions open. It’s a win-win approach, as the company gets to keep valuable internal talent with less time needed to recruit and/or onboard, and women get a better shot at competing for leadership roles.



  1. Bias against working mothers — Without flexible options to have time to care for family and pursue professional goals, women, more often than men, tend to choose to work part-time after having children. This often affects a woman’s long-term ability to earn as much as men.
  2. Direct pay discrimination — Simply put, statistics show that when men and women interview for the same job and have the same experience, men are offered more. According to AAUW research, in a comparison of occupations with at least 50,000 men and 50,000 women in 2017, 107 out of 114 had statistically significant gaps in pay that favored men; six occupations had no significant gap; and just one had a gap favoring women.
  1. Teach women negotiating tactics — I strongly believe we can do more for young women, especially those just starting out their careers, when it comes to negotiating tactics. I can’t tell you how many stories I’ve heard from women that have never countered a salary offer, whether as part of a raise or as part of an initial job offer. If negotiating isn’t learned at an early stage, then women are already playing catch up right out of the gate! This is something we can begin to introduce earlier to give women and girls to educate them about the issue and how to take matters into their own hands. In the past few years, the Girl Scouts have added badges for STEM activities like coding and space science. I’d love to see one on salary negotiation!
  2. Provide them with mentors (both female and male) — This is one I’m especially passionate about as a co-founder of ARA (Attract, Retain, and Advance women in tech) and as an ongoing mentor in the Chicago Innovation Women’s Mentoring Co-Op. Mentorship. It is more important now than ever for men and women to come together to forge valuable relationships that are essential to career growth. A mentor provides insight into the complicated nature of corporate structures and relationships because they’ve “been there.” This type of input is invaluable, regardless of gender, and this transfer of knowledge is key to closing the wage gap. As a mentor, I am passionate about opening doors, creating connections, and empowering future generations. I also aspire to be an advocate and role model so my niece, goddaughter, mentees, peers, and colleagues, can stand tall and achieve in ways we’ve never seen before. I like to think of it as being a daring tribe together — forging stronger ties to help advance other women and impact future generations.
  3. Recommend women for internal career opportunities — Studies show that women are less likely to apply for a position if they don’t feel like they qualify or haven’t completed all the requirements. Internal business leaders need to keep this in mind and remember to recommend qualified women when positions open. It’s a win-win approach, as the company gets to keep valuable internal talent with less time needed to recruit and/or onboard, and women get a better shot at competing for leadership roles. I’ve recently wrote about a successful diversity and inclusion program that Groupon recently created called GREAT (Groupon’s Resource for Emerging and Aspiring Talent). It provides resources and opportunities to the company’s high performing, under-represented employees. By helping develop women, and other under-represented groups, into future internal leaders they’re creating change within their own ranks.
  4. Provide flexible work arrangements Flexible work, such as telecommuting or shifting work hours, means that women with caregiving responsibilities can hold jobs in higher-paying industries and companies. It makes it more realistic for talented women who have children or are caring for a relative to find meaningful work in a job that otherwise wouldn’t be a fit for them. Even if a company doesn’t offer a formal flexible work policy, I often encourage women to speak up and ask about options. Some departments and/or managers may be able to make flexible arrangements for their teams, and it’s the start of a compelling (and very timely) conversation. In the end, it may be something that ends up changing throughout the organization.

Authority Magazine

Leadership Lessons from Authorities in Business, Film, Sports and Tech. Authority Mag is devoted primarily to sharing interesting feature interviews of people who are authorities in their industry. We use interviews to draw out stories that are both empowering and actionable.

Candice Georgiadis

Written by

Candice Georgiadis is an active mother of three as well as a designer, founder, social media expert, and philanthropist.

Authority Magazine

Leadership Lessons from Authorities in Business, Film, Sports and Tech. Authority Mag is devoted primarily to sharing interesting feature interviews of people who are authorities in their industry. We use interviews to draw out stories that are both empowering and actionable.

Welcome to a place where words matter. On Medium, smart voices and original ideas take center stage - with no ads in sight. Watch
Follow all the topics you care about, and we’ll deliver the best stories for you to your homepage and inbox. Explore
Get unlimited access to the best stories on Medium — and support writers while you’re at it. Just $5/month. Upgrade