Beating Burnout: Clark Twiddy of Twiddy & Company On The 5 Things You Should Do If You Are Experiencing Work Burnout

Authority Magazine Editorial Staff
Authority Magazine
Published in
13 min readAug 13, 2021

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Be very intentional at a basic level — this is my way of making sure that Maslow’s hierarchy should be a habit for me. I don’t always get it right but it’s always the goal and I’ve wrestled over time with the sense that this as a goal is inherently selfish; in fact, it’s taken me many years to understand that it’s actually the only way I can serve others well.

Millions of Americans are returning back to work after being home during the pandemic. While this has been exciting for many, some are feeling burned out by their work. What do you do if you are feeling burned out by your work? How do you reverse it? How can you “get your mojo back”? What can employers do to help their staff reverse burnout?

In this interview series called “Beating Burnout: 5 Things You Should Do If You Are Experiencing Work Burnout,” we are talking to successful business leaders, HR leaders and mental health leaders who can share insights from their experience about how we can “Beat Burnout.”.

As a part of this series, I had the pleasure of interviewing Clark Twiddy.

Clark is the President of Twiddy & Company, a hospitality and asset management firm celebrating more than forty years in business along North Carolina’s Outer Banks. Clark also serves on the boards of several public, non-profit, and public sector organizations as well, all in an effort to get a little better every day and serve others well in doing so. A proud father of two daughters, he has also recently published a book on the Outer Banks available on Amazon.

Thank you so much for joining us in this interview series! Before we dive into the main focus of our interview, our readers would love to “get to know you” a bit better. Can you tell us a bit about your childhood backstory?

I was very fortunate to grow up on the Outer Banks of North Carolina with a younger brother and younger sister during a time in the area before it became…

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