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Authority Magazine

Joel Patterson of The Vested Group: How To Delegate Effectively and Be Completely Satisfied With the Results

An Interview With Jerome Knyszewski

Debrief. Once you’ve delegated a task or project, make sure you follow up with your team once the job is complete. You’re not checking for completion — ask them if they felt like the right person for the task? Did they feel like they had what they needed, both internally and externally, to be a smashing success? Were they challenged and engaged by what you delegated? Explore their feedback, and you’ll be able to evaluate your delegation skills based on their responses.

  1. That unique set of superpowers each one of us has that make us brilliant or amazing. Sometimes this is easy to identify, like coding skills or an uncanny encyclopedic knowledge of saved search wildcards, and sometimes more elusive, like being able to diffuse a tense interaction merely by your tone of voice.
  2. That spark or flash of inspiration that pops up unintentionally and inexplicably wows everyone on your project team and beyond and consistently underscores who you are and why you fit in at The Vested Group so well.
  3. The only accurate answer to: where did he learn that? …how’d she come up with that? …when did you find that? …how did he know that? …how did she do that? It’s that cool thing you do that can’t be learned or taught but just is.
  1. Learn your team members’ strengths. You can use several assessment tools to determine your team members’ strengths — my favorite is Gallup StrengthsFinder, but you can use whatever suits your needs and allows you to be consistent. Have your team members take the strengths assessment as part of the onboarding process, and you’ll find value in weaving this knowledge into all kinds of interactions, even beyond delegation.
  2. Learn what each strength brings and needs. This one is key: beyond identifying your team’s strengths, you have to be committed to learning how each power contributes value and what each strength needs to draw energy from. Our organization has found great value in partnering with a business coach who meets with team members individually and in groups to explore the strengths in depth. Armed with this knowledge, you can choose the tasks and projects best suited to particular team members. You’ll be scratching your head at how easy it is to delegate once you can pair the employee with a role seemingly tailor-made for them.
  3. Communicate with transparency. Once you’ve identified who you will delegate something to and why be transparent in your communication. Let your team members know that you see what makes them exceptional, and you want to tap into their strengths with an opportunity to shine. Sharing your specific reasons behind thinking they are the best person for the job not only validates their strengths, but it also shows your authenticity in selecting them to tackle the task.
  4. Debrief. Once you’ve delegated a task or project, make sure you follow up with your team once the job is complete. You’re not checking for completion — ask them if they felt like the right person for the task? Did they feel like they had what they needed, both internally and externally, to be a smashing success? Were they challenged and engaged by what you delegated? Explore their feedback, and you’ll be able to evaluate your delegation skills based on their responses.
  5. Trust yourself and trust your team. Once you’ve made an informed decision to delegate, do so with confidence and then let the group you’ve chosen take the lead. One of the worst things you can do when delegating is to stick around and stay involved — this undermines the team you’ve chosen and doesn’t accomplish opening up time and space for you to do other things. The beauty of being skilled at delegating is you can turn tasks over to people and teams you know will be successful.