Marketing Strategies From The Top: “Let your brand be known for speaking the truth” With Paige Arnof-Fenn of Mavens & Moguls

Christina D. Warner
Authority Magazine
14 min readFeb 21, 2020

--

…Honest. Let your brand be known for speaking the truth, and you become the trusted advocate and go-to source. Any woman can relate to the Spanx and Dove brands for example, they show real women and bodies in their ads with problems their audience can relate to easily.

As a part of our series about “Marketing Strategies From The Top,” I had the pleasure of interviewing Paige Arnof-Fenn. Paige is the founder & CEO of global marketing and branding firm Mavens & Moguls based in Cambridge, MA. Her clients include Microsoft, Virgin, venture-backed startups, as well as non-profit organizations. She graduated from Stanford University and Harvard Business School. She is a popular speaker and columnist who has written for Entrepreneur and Forbes.

Thank you so much for doing this with us! Before we dig in, our readers would love to learn a bit more about you. Can you tell us a story about what brought you to this specific career path?

I did not plan on starting a company. I always wanted to work for a large multinational business and be a Fortune 500 CEO. When I was a student, I looked up to leaders like Meg Whitman and Ursula Burns as my role models. I started my career on Wall Street in the ’80s and had a successful career in corporate America at companies like Procter & Gamble and Coca-Cola and worked at 3 different startups as the head of marketing. I took the leap right after 9/11 when the company I worked for cut their marketing. I had nothing to lose. Being an entrepreneur provides me a platform to do work I truly enjoy with and for people I respect.

I get to set my priorities, I have time to travel and hang out with my inner circle, and work out every day. It has been a journey to get here, but I am lucky to have found it. I love the autonomy, flexibility, and the fact that I know every day the impact that I have on my business. When I worked at big companies, I always felt the ball would roll with or without me, that if I got hit by a bus, someone new would be in my…

--

--