Music Star Stuee Singh Of Sikh Rapper On The Five Things You Need To Shine In The Music Industry

An Interview With Guernslye Honoré

Guernslye Honore
Authority Magazine

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I wish somebody told me that mental health is very important. I did figure this out, so now I am spending more time on my physical health and meditation to keep my mental health in top shape. Creativity flows, and the best ideas come from good mental health.

As a part of our interview series with leaders, stars, and rising stars in the music industry, we had the distinct pleasure of interviewing Stuee Singh.

Rapping in several different languages, Stuee Singh is poised to be the next global musical superstar. Bangkok born, the talented North Indian Rapper and Hip Hop Artist is known as a maverick with a unique musical style.

His rhymes are thought provoking, leadership inspiring and brimming with positive vibes -

Stuee’s full name, Harcharan Singh Thakral means, ‘With God’s Blessing’. His rap inspiration comes from the Sikh holy scripture and the biggest hip hop artists of our time. Along with representing the new age modern Sikh, and showing the world the modern interpretation of his culture, Singh aims to change the game of mainstream hip hop by adding spiritual aspects and highly positive vibes through his songs.

Thank you so much for joining us in this interview series! Before we dive in, our readers would love to learn a bit about your “origin story”. Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

It was a very interesting, character-building childhood. It was certainly challenging. I had some difficult experiences that molded and shaped me to be a natural leader. That combined with many happy memories with my younger sister and maternal grandparents, some with my parents as well. They were not really ready to have kids, so the parenting was not the greatest to begin with. My parents tried their best but it was quite an unhealthy family environment. However, it did shape me to be super creative, brave, and adventurous in creating my own path.

I would find joy in music, including prayer music from the Sikh temple. I did learn how to play the Tabla at a young age, and the guitar as well as the drums.

Even though I was bullied a lot in school emotionally, physically, and psychologically, I was an intelligent and bright kid. Got really good grades.

My best childhood memories are with my maternal grandparents who when I visited India, always made me feel the happiest. Also, I won a poetry competition in school and was always happy to be on stage performing music or acting. Despite many challenges in school and at home, and I didn’t get into anything too crazy, I did party in college and tried weed to escape some difficult memories from my childhood which later in life overcame with therapy. I was a bit of an introvert but always had a pretty positive attitude.

Overall, I grew up alright, despite the unfavorable circumstances. I excelled in school and developed the natural ability to lead, as well as being highly creative and imaginative.

What inspired you to pursue a career in music, and how did your journey begin?

Through the challenging times at home and also in school, I used to go to the temple. My mom took me there, and I heard very classical amazing Indian Sikh cultural music or prayer music. I also learned many instruments not knowing that I would have a career in music in the future. The tabla and sitar really inspired me.

When I grew up into a teenager, I started hearing modern hip hop music, and in my head there was this unique combination of these super classical amazing beats of the tabla mixed with modern hip hop. I always kind of heard it but did know it could be mixed up and turned into a new form until I was a teenager and got into music production. I learned music production and started bringing to life my ideas by mixing classical Sikh cultural heritage music with modern hip-hop beats, and it was super nice.

At 17 I put a hold on it because the circle I was in at the time was very much into drugs, alcohol, and clubbing. I was not really into that. I had to step out because music was drawing me into those things. I took a break and entered my corporate career. Now that I am strong and confident, I realize it’s just about not letting myself get drawn into that crowd. A lot of inspiration aside from Sikh prayer music was also modern hip hop greats like Dr Dre and Snoop Dogg, Eminem, and Justin Timberlake. I feel like music is a lifelong dream and also my purpose in many ways. I need to use my god-gifted talent and share the creativity with people through my music. One day I realized I was not going to get any younger and I couldn’t spend my entire life living comfortably in the safe option, so I decided better now than never to change lanes and step up to the truest part of myself and my passion and follow my dreams. It was time to follow my best and biggest dreams of being a music superstar, getting into rapping and producing music, and acting as well.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

The most interesting story that I can tell you, since I started my career is while I was writing my first song lyrics. I knew that I wanted to get my first song out, and I was thinking about what kind of message do I want to bring out that represents me. So of course, I want to introduce myself as an artist and have my name incorporated in the song. So I wondered, what should be some of the first verses. I wrote a few verses before and after in different parts of the song with my name. What I came up with naturally was this “supersonic lightness brightness paving the way for what might just be the most righteous…” this just popped into my mind and I felt so excited because this is such a unique message in rap and modern music. “supersonic lightness” is kind of the vibe I wanted to share in my music. It’s an inexplicable good energy that comes through.

Another interesting thing that has happened since I started my career, is while I was pondering starting my music career, I met Kevin from Backstreet Boys at a gym at a hotel. I was telling him about the Sikh culture. He was intrigued so he asked me to join him for dinner and I ended up having good connection with him. I hope to reach out to him in the future and maybe he will still remember me.

It has been said that sometimes our mistakes can be our greatest teachers. Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

Regarding the funniest mistake I’ve made, I don’t know if I would call it a mistake exactly, but I would say it was an experiment and I definitely learned from it. I think it was in my first song, I am recording a tabla with a producer who has never actually recorded a tabla before. After recording it, I was trying to mix and master it through somebody who is more culturally used to the tabla sound, I changed the beats of the song and the arrangement of the song. Kind of jumping through the process from recording straight to arrangements and then mixing and mastering. In the end, the track ended up with a totally different vibe, but eventually, it did come out very good. It was a super jumbled-up salad of a process and an interesting learning curve of learning how to do things in order.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

I can honestly say it’s been quite a solo journey. I had to really just decide to follow my dreams no matter what. I have to say to myself that even if I don’t always make an immediate continuous stream of income in this phase, I do have savings and I’m going to invest in myself. I’m going to actually invest in that production course and take the leap.

Emotionally I think my wife has definitely supported me. She’s always encouraged me. She pursues her dream and she is always emotionally there to support me in pursuing my dreams as well.

I think my first wave of producers were always very encouraging and they liked my very unique message. They see that in my Hip Hop, I don’t use profanity. I rap a lot about lightness and brightness, sometimes spiritual topics or modern topics, but also do a lot of pop and current stuff. I also tie my cultural heritage to it as well which you don’t really see that often. I hold true to my cultural heritage, which is something they really encouraged.

I’m very grateful for all the people who emotionally supported me through this journey in music.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

It enhances our human connection. Diversity is the beauty of humanity. Our unique cultures are what adds the flavors to life and make traveling, different foods, and different people interesting. Different historical backgrounds, art music… all of these things are so beautiful from different cultures. I think diversity is the fabric of beauty between humans. I am grateful that I am able to represent my Sikh cultural heritage and bring diversity through my music. I stay true to the art form of the classical Sikh cultural rhymes and melodies, putting that in the most modern form, and representing us from a modern and diverse perspective on the global stage.

The beauty of learning about and exploring new and different horizons and points of view, smell, flavor, and sounds. It helps us grow. We all get culturally more intelligent and it boosts our creativity.

It’s also more entertaining making life more interesting and entertaining for all of us.

As a successful music star, you’ve likely faced challenges along the way. How do you stay motivated? How do you overcome obstacles in your career?

I think this is not relevant, because when you are following your life purpose I don’t think motivation is even a question. It’s an inexplicable feeling, it’s like when you truly find what you are meant to do, it’s effortless. There is an unstoppable force of brightness, happiness, and energy driving you. No obstacle is too large. You stay grateful every day that you get to have beautiful thoughts and translate your creative energy into music and share it with people, no matter how many people are listening to it.

I remember my first song, there were a couple thousand listeners with very few in the beginning. Just knowing that I even had a few listeners made it so rewarding. I can’t imagine as I get more fans and viewers how rewarding it will be.

It’s about being able to share this beautiful energy and bringing people together through music.

It’s a really beautiful journey and I am grateful to share that, so I don’t see any challenges being too big.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why?

  1. I wish my parents told me to just go for it when I was younger and hesitant, or when I was doing my music on the side. I did consult with them but they are more about taking the safer route, but I wish they had said don’t worry, just go for it, and don’t be hesitant.
  2. I wish there was a production coach or somebody who is super successful in music who could mentor me. I wish I had someone like that telling me what things to prioritize or work on. As I’ve started this music journey, I’ve realized that focusing on my music and creativity is the most important foundation of my content, message, and music. The other things come later, the distribution, promotion, and marketing. As long as it’s top-quality content, the rest you don’t have to worry about. Thankfully I am figuring a lot of it out myself.
  3. I wish somebody told me that mental health is very important. I did figure this out, so now I am spending more time on my physical health and meditation to keep my mental health in top shape. Creativity flows, and the best ideas come from good mental health.
  4. I wish somebody told me that I can be the next biggest music superstar, that it does not matter when you start, what genre you are in, or what your background is. Just go for it and you can become a star. I personally have a limitless mindset. It would be nice for somebody with some credible authority to share that same vision.
  5. I wish somebody told me Dr. Dre’s contact number. Haha. I need a reference or an introduction. I need somebody to say hey there is this super talented guy named Stuee from a Sikh background, he’s making super cool unique spiritual rhymes. Give him a call and make some music. Who knows, this can still happen!

Can you share some insights into your creative process? How do you approach songwriting? How do you approach musical collaborations?

I don’t think creativity can be processed. It’s a feeling. Sometimes I have a feeling, and I am inspired by something like food, a beautiful view, or some songs. It’s a feeling and a state of mind that comes, and is happening more often these days. When it comes, I pull out my phone and rap into my voice memos, or write/ type into my phone. A lot of the time it’s continuous songs, melodies, and rhymes. Usually, I mix and match it up later. It’s the base of my mindset.

In terms of my approach to musical collaborations, I vibe with all cultures. I think it’s an energy and chemistry base, so if I have a conversation with somebody who is also a musician and an artist, and we share a good chemistry, connection, and energy, then yeah I am totally up for collaboration.

Your music has resonated with so many fans worldwide. What do you believe sets your music apart?

Well yes, my music has reached fans worldwide. I think there is a long way to go still from where I am to where I want to eventually be. I see myself having millions of fans and followers in the future. I think what really resonates for them with me is my pride in my unique cultural heritage. I am a Sikh rapper who was born and raised in Bangkok but have traveled the world. I lived in the US for a bit. I also lived in Denmark for 6 years, and I rapped in each language as well. There are not many Sikh rappers out there who can rap in different languages, especially a Scandinavian language. I do bring that modern international Sikh character into rapping.

I think my fans resonate most with my bridging between my cultural traditions and modern hip-hop.

How do you connect with your audience?

Well yes, my music has reached fans worldwide. I think there is a long way to go still from where I am to where I want to eventually be. I see myself having millions of fans and followers in the future. I think what really resonates for them with me is my pride in my unique cultural heritage. I am a Sikh rapper who was born and raised in Bangkok but have traveled the world. I lived in the US for a bit. I also lived in Denmark for 6 years, and I rapped in each language as well. There are not many Sikh rappers out there who can rap in different languages, especially a Scandinavian language. I do bring that modern international Sikh character into rapping.

I think my fans resonate most with my bridging between my cultural traditions and modern hip-hop.

With your busy schedule and demanding performances, how do you prioritize self-care and maintain a balance between your personal life and career in the music industry?

I stay healthy. I eat healthy, meditate, do yoga, and hit the gym quite often. I think prioritizing your health in the right way at the right times regarding pre and post-performances or recordings is important. Music is also a lot about positive vibes, and I think a big part of that is leading a healthy lifestyle and maintaining it. It will help boost creativity to make even better music.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. :-)

I think I am already doing that with my music. It is part of a broader vision which is to bring people of different cultures together through love and good energy. The movement I hope to spark with my music is people living with positive energy and living a healthy lifestyle. I hope my music inspires change in people and helps people avoid negativities, such as substances like, alcohol or whatever it is. I hope it will help people enjoy music without intoxicants. I want it to inspire more love between different cultures and inspire better health in communities. Loving each other is a sign of self-love.

I think this music can bring about the movement of self-love on an individual and collective level.

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. :-)

I would love to have a meeting or lunch with Dr. Dre. His music was such a cultural phenomenon. I just feel that there are some beats or melodies in my head that are potentially as big, I just need a producer like him to help me with my ideas and nurture my talent.

I truly would be honored to have lunch or breakfast and discuss a potential beat and productions.

I might also add Jay Z as well, for all the same reasons. I actually rapped about him in my first song.

How can our readers continue to follow your work online?

Instagram: @stueesingh

TikTok: @stueesingh

Facebook: Stuee Singh

Website: Stueesingh.com

You can also find me on Spotify or any other major music platforms.

This was very meaningful, thank you so much! We wish you continued success!

About the interviewer: Guernslye Honoré, affectionately known as “Gee-Gee”, is an amalgamation of creativity, vision, and endless enthusiasm. She has elegantly twined the worlds of writing, acting, and digital marketing into an inspiring tapestry of achievement. As the creative genius at the heart of Esma Marketing & Publishing, she leads her team to unprecedented heights with her comprehensive understanding of the industry and her innate flair for innovation. Her boundless passion and sense of purpose radiate from every endeavor she undertakes, turning ideas into reality and creating a realm of infinite possibilities. A true dynamo, Gee-Gee’s name has become synonymous with inspirational leadership and the art of creating success.

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Guernslye Honore
Authority Magazine

Guernslye Honoré, affectionately known as "Gee-Gee", is an amalgamation of creativity, vision, and endless enthusiasm.