The Caring Movement: Lane Michel’s Big Idea That Might Change The World

Fotis Georgiadis
Apr 2 · 7 min read

Let your work unfold. A leader I had the honor to work alongside would take the most wild or unexpected turns in direction. She was brilliant; I had whiplash from the changes she cause. But, her decisions were inspired and created growth beyond what I could have imagined. Her secret was to have faith that her connection to something much bigger always guided her. I learned that life and work is an unfolding process that is to be requires active participation.

As a part of my series about “Big Ideas That Might Change The World In The Next Few Years” I had the pleasure of interviewing Lane Michel.

Lane Michel serves as the President of Unified Caring Association (UCA). He believes UCA’s mission serves an important role in bringing more heart, consciousness and action to both giving and receiving care. By supporting a community of people in both giving and receiving caring, we create a better world we want for current and future generations.

For more than four decades, Lane has dedicated himself to his work and has gained experience in fields ranging from computer technology, marketing, venture capital, public safety, life coaching, management consulting, animal rescue and leadership development. He holds degrees from both San Jose State University and Santa Clara University.

Thank you so much for doing this with us! Before we dig in, our readers would like to get to know you a bit. Can you please tell us a story about what brought you to this specific career path?

My life has been a series of wonderful leadership adventures in both for-profit and nonprofit organizations. Never has there been small ideas on my path. I love harnessing the energy that makes big ideas a reality. This always has more to do with the unseen than what I think or feel I know. Unified Caring is one of those big ideas having a huge impact on many thousands of lives.

When I was approached about this leadership role, I knew instantly that this was my path unfolding beautifully once again. This has been a fusion of my career paths. People are invited join the UCA membership community that helps them impart self-care and in turn give care to others. Together, we work to address urgent unmet needs for greater caring. UCA has a special knack for caring for the innocent beings needing so much more from us all: children, the elderly and animals.

Can you please share with us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

There are far too many! I am truly inspired by the amazing souls I have been able to work alongside, speak with, study and emulate. These stories are a collage that creates my unique signature.

Which principles or philosophies have guided your life? Your career?

We all live a heart adventure where we endeavor to define and complete our purpose while dealing with the daily adventure of our lives. Most struggle to remember their life’s purpose because the daily grind eclipses what their heart knows they are here to accomplish.

Getting things done is only accomplished through shifting: First, responding yes to any challenge.Then moving from YES to springing into action by doing things “directionally right and roughly correct”.

Heart intelligence is bringing our mind and heart into coherence, delivers the resilience and consciousness we need in our world today.

Ok thank you for that. Let’s now move to the main focus of our interview. Can you tell us about your “Big Idea That Might Change The World”?

The big idea is to invite people globally to become Custodians of the Caring Movement.

Today’s world is in need of caring now more than ever. Specifically, a better way to care for ourselves AND to serve others. Not just watching from the sidelines, but actually DOING. Being actively engaged in building caring communities that make a difference.

A Custodian is someone who takes responsibility for caring, not just for themselves but for their family, the community and the world. The Caring Movement is taking action to meet urgent unmet needs that then gives self-improvement greater meaning.

We can be healthier and happier when we are connected to others and serving. These questions guide Custodians of the Caring Movement:

  • What is in YOUR heart?

How do you think this will change the world?

Choosing to put caring into action sets anyone on a path that will make them both happier and healthier.

Being a part of the community leading the Caring Movement amplifies that impact of those caring acts. The world is changing and making the world a more caring place is a choice everyone needs to make. Being a Custodian for changing the world is taking some level of responsibility and support for small and large acts of caring. Giving doesn’t need to mean “money”. Volunteering allows us to give other things like our attention, time, and energy which makes change a reality.

Keeping “Black Mirror” and the “Law of Unintended Consequences” in mind, can you see any potential drawbacks about this idea that people should think more deeply about?

Confusion may arise in our need to impart self-care or while serving others. A false sense of scarcity drives most of this confusion. The truth is there are many positive examples of giving the last dollar, coming to the aid of another person, and discovering untapped limitless power to overcome a threat. An unintended consequence of accessing our abundant life force is recognizing that we can choose differently at any moment. And at that very moment, we set in motion many unforeseen ripples of changes and consequences.

Was there a “tipping point” that led you to this idea? Can you tell us that story?

We learned that youth rescued from sex trafficking were often given trash bags to carry their possessions with them. This was not a random or small set of incidences. It was shockingly pervasive.

It was a story our members and the Association have heard far too often that was right in our faces: caring means truly feeling the need another person may have. How did it feel to be worth no more than a trash bag? Or, for our elders living in a senior facility, how does it feel to be forgotten, isolated and unloved in a way that shows a disrespect for a long life? Or for horses, a symbol of great freedom, how does it feel to be abused or sold as feed after the horse “is no longer useful?”

Feeling, empathizing and taking caring action for others in their moment of need has the promise of delivering a kinder, humbler, more full and productive world for all life on this planet.

What do you need to lead this idea to widespread adoption?

Like-minded people have catalyzed every great change, every tipping point, our world has known. UCA needs people and organizations to join the Caring Movement. To take caring action in their communities.

If you care about delivering a better world for current and future generations, then pause. Look at your relationships and the people who surrounds you. Listen for where caring is needed. And when you hear a need — for you surely will — act intentionally.

What are your “5 Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Started” and why. (Please share a story or example for each.)

People are “complexors”. When an executive blasted a series of interrogating questions, all seemingly aligned to his unspoken conclusion, devastatingly tearing down the work that was the target, it was clear to me that the complexor that can be in us all was at the heart of many failures. I learned that in order to succeed you must stop and simplify.

Let your work unfold. A leader I had the honor to work alongside would take the most wild or unexpected turns in direction. She was brilliant; I had whiplash from the changes she cause. But, her decisions were inspired and created growth beyond what I could have imagined. Her secret was to have faith that her connection to something much bigger always guided her. I learned that life and work is an unfolding process that is to be requires active participation.

Listen more because you will never know enough. A colleague with a mind so sharp it could split a hair was always many steps ahead of the rest of us. Unfortunately, his brilliance was stunted by his lack of listening to the very people who we led. Listening shows care. Listening shows humility and creates the best solutions.

Everyone is making it up as they go. As a leader, consultant and coach I continually uncovered “imposter syndrome” and internal lack of self-worth at the top of organizations. While much of what leaders do has been tested and learned, a great deal is new and unknown. A great leader taught me to draw on the best, know when to move, then learn from the mistakes that are inevitable. Fearing the mistakes was ego holding me back.

Can you share with our readers what you think are the most important “success habits” or “success mindsets”?

  1. Build Resilience. Simply build stronger coherence between mind and heart.

Some very well known VCs read this column. If you had 60 seconds to make a pitch to a VC, what would you say? He or she might just see this if we tag them :-)

N/A

How can our readers follow you on social media?

Unified Caring Association can be found on twitter (@UnifiedCaring), LinkedIn and Pinterest. Our radio show and blog are all accessible from UnifiedCaring.org.

Thank you so much for joining us. This was very inspirational.

Authority Magazine

In-depth Interviews with Authorities in Pop Culture, Business, Tech, Wellness, & Social Impact

Authority Magazine

In-depth Interviews with Authorities in Business, Pop Culture, Wellness, Social Impact, and Tech. We use interviews to draw out stories that are both empowering and actionable.

Fotis Georgiadis

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Passionate about bringing emerging technologies to the market

Authority Magazine

In-depth Interviews with Authorities in Business, Pop Culture, Wellness, Social Impact, and Tech. We use interviews to draw out stories that are both empowering and actionable.