Candice Georgiadis
Sep 3 · 8 min read

The most important thing in my opinion is to offer unique experiences. Customer service and amenities are key but we have found success in bringing something different to the table — allowing our customers to experience “real life” at an Italian winery. Every experience is unique and must be perceived as unique by customers. Our guests enjoy our culture, they live it, they breathe it. The best way to travel is to be submerged by traditions which are part of the biodiversity of the land you are visiting. We believe you will see more and more travel and hospitality companies tuning into the unique experiences that draw travelers to them.

As part of my series about “exciting developments in the travel industry over the next five years”, I had the pleasure of interviewing Orlando and Attilio Pecchenino of the Pecchenino Wine Estate. The Pecchenino family has worked in viticultural for over four generations and made the leap from small wine production to a winery of international recognition under the brothers, Orlando and Attilio Pecchenino. Today, Pecchenino consists of 54 acres in Dogliani and an additional seven acres in Monforte. Focused on the production of high-quality Dolcetto, Nebbiolo and a few other select varietals, Pecchenino’s vines are painstakingly cared for by hand. In addition to its consistent high quality, Pecchenino distinguishes itself by being the only winery to produce Dolcetto aged in oak, resulting in Dolcetto wines with an aging potential of over 10 years.


Thank you so much for joining us! Can you tell us about your family’s history as it ties to the Pecchenino wine estate?

My family has lived in Langhe for almost 200 years. My great-grandfather moved here in the Dogliani area around 1800, when he started the wine business that we are still running today. After he passed away, my grandfather Attilio took over and after him my father, Marino, was in charge. Now, my brother and I are keeping the family tradition going strong. In 1994, we bought a very old country cottage that was built around 1600. We moved all our wine business here and set out to build a B&B, Casa Pecchenino, which was finalized and opened in 2010. The restoration was beautifully done and preserved the original architectural features by using local and traditional materials. Age-old architectural details lost to time were brought back to light. The original furnishings and decorations recreate the atmosphere of the traditional Langhe-style dwelling making the rooms more comfortable and home-like. The surroundings are lovely. The terrace gives onto the green valley that provides a spectacular contrast of scenery, from vineyards and meadows to the untamed countryside and mountain chain, running from the Ligurian Alps to the Valle d’Aosta massif, rising in the background. The majestic Monviso peak can hardly go unnoticed. At dawn and dusk, the sky turns the most amazing colors you will ever see.

Can you share the most interesting story that happened to you since you took on responsibility of the wine estate in 1987?

One of the hardest moments was when we decided to buy the “podere Bricco Botti” where we now have the core of our operation. It was a very old ruin in such a bad condition — every single corner of it showed us “stories” of the farmers who lived there in the past. These farmers had been very humble and hard-working people; firm and single-minded. Restoring it was very challenging but interesting and rewarding at the same time.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

I have made many mistakes. At the very beginning, I decided to create a new wine. Several years ago in Italy the best-selling wine of this area was a Freisa. Usually before the bottling process, the wine was refermented in stainless steel tanks. During the re-fermentation, the wine produced pressure in the tank. Unfortunately, the tank was not sealed properly, and the juice came out; we lost it all. I learned that day that winemaking is a very detail-oriented job and you need to be careful in every single step of the process.

What do you think makes your wine and Casa Pecchenino stand out? Can you share a story?

There is only one way to make wine. We grow the grapes in the vineyards and then, after the harvest, we work in the wineries to make it. When you are in control of the whole wine process, from viticulture management to the wine-making, you will be surprised to recognize in our wines the same approach and the unique expression of their terroir; Different grapes, different wines but the same personality and style. When you taste a wine, you can understand the personality of the wine-maker, his interpretation of the terroir. I remember when I started producing our first vintages, we were looking to create an opulent wine, but that style was not embodying our terroir. So, we decided to change approach and give elegance, balance and finesse to our products. We stayed true to our terroir, as does Casa Pecchenino. The surroundings are lovely, and the terrace overlooks the vineyards, meadows and mountain range, running from the Ligurian Alps to the Valle d’Aosta massif, rising in the background. Our guests can explore the area’s trekking, mountain bike and road bike trails. Casa Pecchenino offers personalized gourmet packages, including tastings of local food specialties and wining and dining at restaurants and inns serving traditional Langhe-style dishes.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”? Can you share a story about that?

My suggestion is to work humbly, with an open mind in order to learn as much as possible, growing professionally and culturally. It’s important to keep your own identity despite the trends — especially if the trends are going in a different direction.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story?

I have to thank many people. Co-workers, friends, my family. Among all of them there is only one person, though, who always taught me to do my best either in my personal life and in my profession: my grandfather. Unfortunately, he passed away when I was very young, but I am sure he would have been proud of us now.

Let’s jump to the core of our discussion. Can you share with our readers about the innovations that you are bringing to the travel and hospitality industries with Casa Pecchenino Bed and Breakfast?

Rebuilding our farmhouse was very hard and very expensive because it was old and ruined. We truly restored it to its original splendor. We could have spent that money on something different or invested it somewhere else but I felt the duty and responsibility to invest in our Piedmontese heritage- bringing back to life this historical farmhouse. We are the sons of this wonderful land and are the “keepers” of this beauty and we are called to defend and portray his legacy for future generations. That is why agritourism is so important. True agritourism should bring the traveler into close contact with the land and what it’s like to work to produce wonderful wines that reflect the beauty and uniqueness of the terroir. We offer tours of our winery and wine tastings, personalized gourmet tours, and tourist information and maps for trails and routes. In this way, we are a true host to our guests. They should feel as if they are visiting good friends who know the ins and outs of this area and will cater to their every need. It is a more personal experience than to stay miles away from all this beauty in a small, dark hotel room. Of course, we have all of the draws that tourists want like comfortably-furnished common areas that guests are always welcome to use for relaxing, reading and socializing, a fully-equipped kitchen, spacious indoor dining room for breakfast or dinner, outdoor room overlooking the vineyards, sitting room, gardens, TV, Wi-Fi, and bicycle and car parking areas.

Which “pain point” are you trying to address by introducing agritourism to the area?

Casa Pecchenino has five very comfortable rooms on the farmhouse’s first and second floor: four double rooms and one mini-apartment with a kitchen area. The farmhouse is equipped with a kitchen and two rooms, one outdoors and one indoors, for breakfast and dinner parties, for shared use by guests. This allows our guests to really experience being at the winery, and not just visiting for the day. We would like to offer the unique opportunity to visit Langhe and experience a day-to-day life in our wine land. The uniqueness of our land is what makes it so special. The landscape, the wines, the history that surrounds you is breathtaking and, above all, real. Here you experience real life. Emotions and feelings are submerged in our culture, in our hills, in our wines.

Can you share an example of how travel and hospitality companies will be adjusting over the next five years to the new ways that consumers like to travel?

The most important thing in my opinion is to offer unique experiences. Customer service and amenities are key but we have found success in bringing something different to the table — allowing our customers to experience “real life” at an Italian winery. Every experience is unique and must be perceived as unique by customers. Our guests enjoy our culture, they live it, they breathe it. The best way to travel is to be submerged by traditions which are part of the biodiversity of the land you are visiting. We believe you will see more and more travel and hospitality companies tuning into the unique experiences that draw travelers to them.

You are a “travel insider”. How would you describe your “perfect vacation experience”?

Vacation to me means three things — relax, rest, and comfort.

Can you share with our readers how you have used your success to bring goodness to the world?

We felt the duty to give people the opportunity to enjoy the wonderful land that we are privileged to enjoy daily. We have the moral duty to keep the tradition and the culture that our ancestors alive, and furthermore to share it with others. We offer all of this in our little oasis of comforts. All our guests should feel at home here and we will continue to make their experiences here even more enjoyable.

How can our readers follow you on social media?

Website: www.pecchenino.com

Facebook: Pecchenino

Instagram: @pecchenino_winery

This was very inspiring. Thank you so much for joining us!

Authority Magazine

Leadership Lessons from Authorities in Business, Film, Sports and Tech. Authority Mag is devoted primarily to sharing interesting feature interviews of people who are authorities in their industry. We use interviews to draw out stories that are both empowering and actionable.

Candice Georgiadis

Written by

Candice Georgiadis is an active mother of three as well as a designer, founder, social media expert, and philanthropist.

Authority Magazine

Leadership Lessons from Authorities in Business, Film, Sports and Tech. Authority Mag is devoted primarily to sharing interesting feature interviews of people who are authorities in their industry. We use interviews to draw out stories that are both empowering and actionable.

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