Why the End of America’s Christian Majority Might Be a Good Thing for Christianity

Joe Forrest
Backyard Church
Published in
7 min readNov 14, 2022

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In September 2022, Pew Research Center released a startling report that claimed — in rather stark terms — “Christians could make up less than half of the U.S. population within a few decades.

With headlines like “America’s Christian majority is on track to end” and “America’s Christian majority could end by 2070,” the report’s findings ricocheted across secular news outlets with an unmistakable hint of glee and schadenfreude.

But for those of us in ministry (or who’ve simply been paying attention), the projections came as less of a surprise. Did we really need longitudinal survey data to tell us what we’ve been witnessing firsthand for years?

Some of us (myself included) would counter Pew Research’s projections with an equally bold claim: America’s so-called Christian majority likely ended decades ago — especially if one considers “lifestyle markers” like regular church attendance, Bible reading, and prayer.

Therefore, Pew Research’s projections might be pointing toward a different cultural phenomenon: An unwillingness to be associated with what passes for Christianity in America today.

And that could actually be good news for Christianity.

Bursting the Christian Bubble

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Joe Forrest
Backyard Church

Joe Forrest writes on the intersection of faith, culture, secularism, and politics.